Verified FBN Member (KS)
Agronomy

What yield drag should I expect on our Dicamba damaged soybeans?

We have about 150 acres of liberty beans that were dinged pretty bad a few weeks ago. We have had some rains and new leaves are coming on and I hope that will help. Of course, these were some of our best looking beans.

The local co-op admitted they were the ones that damaged them.

We have several fields along the river that had mild damage on the outer rows. We also had some other neighbors with damage.

Would this be because we have had a lack of wind? High dew point and humidity? 105-110 heat indexes? It seems like everyone around the creeks and rivers have damage.

What yield drag should I expect on our Dicamba damaged soybeans?
Verified FBN Member (IA)

Sometimes almost no yield drag from what I'm told my guess is the damage in the large amount of acres was inversion without being angry I would talk to the neighbor that did this more than likely they have insurance if it is bad,depending what stage the bean is in a little stress won't hurt however I would contact an agronomist to get an infield eye on it if it's real bad yield drag may happen. Was the bean in flowering stage?

Verified FBN Member (IN)

They definitely did not spray according to the labeled directions, if temps were that high and no wind. I would get an opinion from your seed agronomist on damage done. Let the Co-op pay the difference in yield. Beans are pretty resilient, they may make a good comeback with the right weather.

Verified FBN Member (KS)

I agree they weren't recommended conditions. I guess my next step would be proving yield loss due to it. You can see the ones with damage. The one has minor damage, but didn't lose its pods.

Verified FBN Member (IA)

The earlier the better for letting people know definitely off label spraying

Verified FBN Member (MN)
(edited)

I was dinged pretty good 2 years ago by dicamba but had very little noticeable yield loss. Maybe a couple small areas where I lost 5 bpa. The rest I couldn't say for certain I lost anything. The beans looked bad/cupped/stunted but the yield was on par with the rest of the field for the most part. Some areas of dinged beans did better than the field average. You almost have to let the combines roll before coming to a conclusion on whether you were actually hurt or not. I'd have the conversation with the neighbor for sure. But don't jump to conclusions. Hopefully, they were like my neighbor and promised to make it right, post harvest, if damage was done.

Verified FBN Member (MN)

In the experiences I've seen around my area the damage is usually very minimal. I would definitely keep track of it though. The co-op has admitted to it so they should be prepared to make it right if there is loss. In our area I know the co-ops deal with damage claims like that every year so it shouldn't be new to them. Good luck

Verified FBN Member (IL)

We've had plenty of neighbor's complain about dicamba drift in the past. Told them to keep track of when they combine only to not hear anything from them till you ask about it. Seems like they all said they were better where the cupping was at. One guy said they were 8bu better.

We used to put an ounce per tank of post spray to shorten the distance between nodes on our beans and keep them from getting to tall before we planted extend beans.

I have to admit the cupping looks rough in our area this year due to our lack of moisture after everyone sprayed post. Was dry for a month after with only a couple tenths. Wasn't much bean growth at all.

Verified FBN Member (IA)

My dicamba damaged beans had an 8 bushel yield drag

Verified FBN Member (MN)

My beans that had dicamba damage were 15 bushels lost per acre on 70 acres. It was sprayed by a commercial applicator that followed the label 100%.

Verified FBN Member (KS)

I have 140 that had dicamba damage about 5 weeks ago they lost on average the top 7 leaves and stems. Just stems pods and blooms sticking up in the air. No growth for a month and now have grown new leaves out of the top. I am concerned that they have been set back and may not mature before frost.

Verified FBN Member (IL)
(edited)

I have been affected/damaged twice in the last 3 years. Good luck trying to prove your true damage. But I can assure you that yield losses are far more prevalent than yield gains! Last year my custom applied Dicamba damaged neighbors crop. All 3 of these instances were do to days later, past applying, volatilization, and then moving off target. Not one was do to direct spry drift! This is totally uncontrollable as it is due to days after spraying weather conditions. Temperature, humidity, and wind, all uncontrollable! This is reason enough to rescind, and recall this product label. Over 96% of all Extend bean damage claims are exactly this. All chemical providers, Monsanto/Bayer, Dupont, and BASF, will never admit to this as that would put their LABEL in deep trouble immediately. This year I've been told by several sources involved in these damage claims, this year is on a record pace for damage claims. This should not surprise anyone one with the weather conditions, and crop planting, and growth progress this year.This results in a bad situation for all agriculture as a whole, as it will only lead to tougher restrictions on all pesticides, and applications, no matter what they are.

Verified FBN Member (SD)

I guess I pretty much concur with the immediate previous post. In 2017, the nation wide debut for Extend Beans, I sprayed all of my beans, being very careful not to drift onto neighbor's beans. Basically Monsanto said that the volatility was SUBSTANTIALLY lower than previous forms of dicamba. REMEMBER? Another neighbor also had a COOP spray his dicamba . immediately north of both of our fields was another neighbor with non dicamba beans. There is no doubt that was the most severely damaged beans. I believe all of the damage was from after spray movement - i.e. post spray volitalization (forgot the term). Trying to do the right thing, which as far as I am concerned Monsanto did not, I turned 6 or more neighbors in for claims with my insurance. The worst damage bean party told the adjuster he couldn't ask for damage in good conscience because as he moved away from the harsh visual damage, the yield went down. The absolute least damaged field of non dicamba beans, which were also damaged by his applicator with uncleaned equipment, asked for damage. I think some of the parties took advantage of an opportunity to get free money. I don't really know. I stayed out of it and let the adjuster deal with everything. I felt Monsanto owed me for the pain and suffering, worry, and reputation problems..............Fortunately to my knowledge the insurance company did not hold it against me suggesting there was a lawsuit for recovery against Monsanto of which I have not heard anything. The pod and bean counts on two of the damaged bean fields closest were actually higher than my dicamba beans. I don't know what is right. Just wanted to put the info out there. I did not spray any dicamba on my dicamba beans in 2018 - you can guess why. Unfortunately I had all PP beans in 2019.

Verified FBN Member (IL)

I am on a local Co-op board that had 23 claims filed last year (One was mine). Of the claims that where weighed out 22 had no yield loss or slight yield gains. The one that did pay out was for 6 bushels and occurred after a very late application of dicamba by a neighbor (When the beans where blooming). Agree that the technology is a tough thing to swallow but the overall penalty is minimal for most situations.

Verified FBN Member (KS)

I live in western Kansas and I didn't know that bean leaves were not supposed to be cupped till the dicamba beans came out. There is a lot of wheat grown out here and most of it is sprayed after harvest with dicamba. Damage is very little with cupped beans. Just be thankful they The neighbors are trying to control The resistant weeds. The weeds are going to win that's my worry.

Verified FBN Member (MN)

We farm in SW Minnesota, in 2017 we had damage caused by dicamba. It was different because it was caused by contamination in the co-ops sprayer, it was so bad you could see the difference in the beans where they shut the sprayer of early. Several agronomists looked and did counts, the adjuster for the insurance company agreed that there was a loss. At harvest it measured to have a 20% average loss across all our fields, some were worse than others.

After the damage the beans stopped almost all growth at the top six inches of the plant then tried to start on at the bottom of the plant that never developed before harvest.

The yield loss might not be noticable at harvest but most likely there is some.

Verified FBN Member (KS)

Very good info. I guess it depends on the stage of the beans and time of year. I still have blooms coming on but I'm afraid it may be too late for them to do anything. Across the road the beans haveb70 or more pods and the damaged ones have almost a consistent 38.

Verified FBN Member (KS)

****, in almost all my experiences both custom cut and owned beans with condition like we've had the last month the dinged bean have yielded right with rest of bean or in some fields yielded more, my advise would be very careful how you approach neighbors, this is very hot topic and you may find you don't know the neighbor as well as you thought, problem with inversion is no one can tell were or how far it came from, good luck but doubt you have much yield lose

Verified FBN Member (NE)

There are not any non dicamba beans within at least five miles of our farm that are not cupped. We were told the damage is from neighbors spraying dicamba products on corn. Due to weather, some of our soybeans were damaged before any of the neighbors has sprayed beans. Too early to tell how much if any yield affected. The worst field in our area is not near as bad as what you guys are describing. Pod counts are close to dicamba soybeans, so will see how they fill.

Verified FBN Member (MO)

I had 300 acres damaged by dicamba last year. I honestly believe that 160 acres had 10 bushel yield drag. The whole 300 acres had to be resprayed because it would not canopy. I also not that the Japanese Beetles were fierce on the beans with cupped leaves. I have not been compensated a cent for the damage so far.

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