FBN Resources

Welcome to FBN Resources. Your central place to stay up to date on the latest content including reports, videos, blog articles and more created by FBN experts and geared toward the future of farming, supporting better agricultural practices and helping put Farmers First.

Resource Library


Aug 18, 2022

by Brad Roberts

With harvest quickly approaching, have you thought about using a desiccant for your crops? Using a desiccant like FBN® Willowood Paraquat on crops promotes rapid, more uniform crop dry down, helping maximize harvestability. Desiccation ensures a quicker, more complete dry down to maintain crop quality, with a more uniform sample and less issues affecting grade. And because desiccant usage means all areas of the field are dry and ready to harvest at the same time, its application means more acres can be harvested each day in an effort to maximize harvest efficiency. 3 Steps for Successful Desiccant Application  1. Use a Surfactant Surfactants are adjuvants that reduce surface tension to help facilitate the dispersing, spreading, wetting, or other surface modifying properties of liquids. While many pesticides require the addition of an adjuvant, some do not.  Be sure to read the label thoroughly before applying in case a specific surfactant is required. FBN Direct offers excellent surfactant options, including IN-Zorb™ 90 . 2. Be Strategic with Application Timing Paraquat is typically activated by sunlight, so plan to apply in cloudy weather or during the evening for best coverage.  3. Plan for Weed Control  Desiccation is not a method of weed control, but rather a harvest aid . If weed control is an issue, FBN has several options as well, and these can be used alone or in conjunction with FBN® Willowood Paraquat . Shop for Crop Protection Products With an incredibly diverse crop nutrition product portfolio,  FBN Direct®  has the desiccant products you need this season. Shop conveniently anywhere, anytime online or through the  FBN® mobile app  with transparent list prices and delivery direct to your farm.  Copyright © 2014 - 2022 Farmer's Business Network, Inc. All rights Reserved. The sprout logo, “Farmers Business Network”, “FBN”, and “FBN Direct” are trademarks or registered trademarks of Farmer's Business Network, Inc. FBN Direct products and services and other products distributed by FBN Direct are offered by FBN Inputs, LLC and are available only in states where FBN Inputs, LLC is licensed and where those products are registered for sale or use, if applicable. If applicable, please check with your local extension service to ensure registration status. Nothing contained on this page, including the prices listed should be construed as an offer for sale, or a sale of products. All products and prices are subject to change at any time and without notice. Terms and conditions apply. ALWAYS READ AND FOLLOW LABEL DIRECTIONS. It is a violation of federal and state law to use any pesticide product other than in accordance with its label. The distribution, sale and use of an unregistered pesticide is a violation of federal and/or state law and is strictly prohibited. We do not guarantee the accuracy of any information provided on this page or which is provided by us in any form. It is your responsibility to confirm prior to purchase and use that a product is labeled for your specific purposes, including, but not limited to, your target crop or pest and its compatibility with other products in a tank mix and that the usage of a product is otherwise consistent with federal, state and local laws. We reserve the right to restrict sales on a geographic basis in our sole discretion. You must have a valid applicator license to use restricted use pesticides. Please consult your state department of agriculture for complete rules and regulations on the use of restricted use pesticides, as some products require specific record-keeping requirements. The material provided is for educational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for specific agronomic, business, legal, investment or professional advice. Where specific advice is necessary or appropriate, consult with a qualified agronomist, financial planner, or investment manager. Neither Farmer's Business Network, Inc. nor any of its affiliates makes any representations or warranties, express or implied, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in the material and any liability therefore is expressly disclaimed.


Aug 11, 2022

by Kevin McNew

The 2022 growing season has seen U.S. farmers facing many critical challenges with late planting, record-setting heat, persistent drought and regionalized flooding. The result has led to sub-par growing conditions in many key growing regions.  USDA will release their first survey on U.S. corn and soybean yield potential in their Crop Production report on August 12, 2022.  Since 2019, FBN® has been closely monitoring state and county corn and soybean yield forecasts. And with the USDA set to release their first survey on U.S. corn and soybean yield potential, what does FBN forecast? FBN’s forecast for corn and soybean yield potential According to a survey of analysts, on average they expect the U.S. corn yield to be 175.9 bushels per acre, and soybeans are pegged at 51.1 bushels per acre. (1) In 2021, U.S. corn yields were record high at 177.0 bushels per acre, and the U.S. soybean yield in 2021 was 51.4. For the 2022 crop cycle, FBN’s corn and soybean yield forecasts have been declining in tandem with deteriorating crop conditions as reported by USDA. (2) Drought and extreme heat have been a persistent problem over the Southern and Central Plains this growing season, and at times brought unfavorable growing conditions into Western Iowa, Eastern South Dakota and Southern Minnesota.  Weather forecasts for the balance of August show heat and dryness likely to remain, which will challenge crop yield potential in these key growing areas. What this means for the crop year The margin of error for corn and soybean yield forecasts should decline among firms as harvest season approaches. This has been a crop year that continues to have problems pop up - hot and dry weather, significantly delayed planting, localized flooding. Regardless of USDA’s Friday yields, we expect the final corn yield to fall short of the current expectations by the market. Become a member today Become an FBN member today and join a global network of farmers — 43,000+ strong and growing — who are already taking advantage of the opportunity to reduce their cost of production and maximize the value of their crops.  As an FBN member, get insight from experts in the latest FBN Research publication for free in the Reports section of the FBN app. Sources: Survey conducted by Reuters and released on August 8, 2022. USDA Crop Progress reports for 2022 FBN Market Advisory services are offered by FBN BR LLC, dba FBN Brokerage, FBN BR and FBN Market Advisory - NFA ID: 0508695 Disclaimer: The views and opinions are solely those of the author as of the date of publication, are subject to change at any time due to market or economic conditions, will not be updated or supplemented after the date hereof and may not necessarily come to pass. The views and opinions expressed herein do not reflect those of all personnel at FBN BR LLC (FBN) or the views of the Farmer's Business Network Inc. as a whole. FBN makes no representations, warranties, or guarantees as to this content. Any charts and graphs provided are for illustrative purposes only. Any performance quoted represents past performance. Past performance does not guarantee future results. Commodity trading involves risks, including the possible loss of principal. Copyright © 2014-2022 Farmer's Business Network, Inc. All rights Reserved. "Farmers Business Network," "FBN," and "Farmers First" are registered trademarks of Farmer's Business Network, Inc. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.


Aug 10, 2022

by Brad Roberts

When you become an FBN® member, you’ll have access to a number of free tools and resources to help you track your farm data throughout the season.  And as you get busier and busier, using these free tools will not only benefit your productivity, it will help you maximize the profit potential of your operation and better understand what’s happening on your farm.  Here are eight ways you can be tracking data as a free FBN member.  1. Track field growth It’s important to understand how your crops are progressing throughout the season. The best tool to do this is included in your free FBN account. Watch a short demo video to understand how to use satellite imagery and change detection maps within your account.  2. Get in-season yield prediction* If you’re like most farmers, you’ll want to gain insight into your field’s yield potential. But how do you determine that? Our in-season Yield Prediction tool uses your own planting data along with historical field data, satellite imagery, weather details and more to give you a more complete picture of what your yield might look like. And throughout the season, the Yield Prediction tool will help you make informed decisions.  In order to take advantage of the Yield Prediction tool, you need to upload your planting data or add the data as a manual entry within your account.  This tool can be accessed within the FBN mobile app as well as the “My Reports” section within your member account. These predictions are updated approximately every six days.  3. Scout your fields During the course of your growing season, any number of issues can arise, which can include: Pest pressure Plant disease Weather events Being able to track which areas of your fields are affected can be critical to your in-season defenses. 4. Track maturity and environment Due to the fact that you’ll likely have different products planted across your operation in varying environments, it’s helpful to have a weather tool at your disposal. The Weather tool can be accessed in your FBN account and allows you to track things like Growing Degree Units (GDU). Data for the weather tool is pulled from 40,000 weather stations, NOAA and NASA data feeds. It also takes into account data that you’ve uploaded to your account.  Watch a quick video to learn more about the Weather tool: 5. Keep tabs on farm activities As the season wears on, you’ll have more and more actions taking place on any of your given fields. One of the easiest ways to track activities like planting, application and scouting activities by date is by utilizing the Timeline feature to quickly review what’s been happening. 6. Collect application data Collecting and storing all of your data in one centralized location will help you keep track of all of your activities. Collecting and storing all of your data enables you to view map layers for visual analysis options, track activities through the Timeline feature mentioned above, edit tank mix information and gain access to the Strip Trial Report that provides information on a variety of test insights.  7. Contribute invoices FBN members have access to tools that help them understand what other members in the network are paying for their products, what they’re paying and what opportunities there may be to secure a similar product for less.**  But how do you share invoices in order to contribute to the network and share this information with fellow farmers?  This video shows you how to add invoices to your account: 8. Clean up application data If you upload application data but leave out some of the key details you’ll need later, you have the ability to edit that data with the Application feature . This will ensure you’ve included all of the right products within a tank mix at the correct rates in which they were applied.  Additional resources If you ever need help uploading data into your account or have other questions, please email data@farmersbusinessnetwork.com and our team of Data Specialists will be happy to assist you.  To access and learn more about these resources there are various levels of contributing data to ensure your account is ready to Power Up Your Farm. Become a member today Become an FBN member today and join a global network of farmers — 43,000+ strong and growing — who are already taking advantage of the opportunity to reduce their cost of production and maximize the value of their crops.  Copyright © 2014 - 2022 Farmer's Business Network, Inc. All rights Reserved. The sprout logo, “Farmers Business Network”, “FBN”, "Farmers First", “FBN Direct” , "F2F", and "F2F Genetics Network" are trademarks or registered trademarks of Farmer's Business Network, Inc.  *Yield predictions are based on statistical and agronomic models, research and data (including historical weather and agronomic data), and information provided by other FBN members and you, to generate the estimates and other information we provide. These do not guarantee actual results. Our models, data and recommendations may change over time. Individual results may vary, as weather, agronomic conditions and farming practices differ across growers, locations and years. Consult your agronomist and other service professionals before making financial, risk management, and farming decisions. **Information and insights provided by FBN are based on submissions from FBN members and in certain cases other third-party information, and its availability and accuracy is not guaranteed. Information and data may not be available for all seed products including some seed products distributed by FBN.


Since 2020, U.S. farmland values have been increasing thanks to rising grain prices and low interest rates. According to the USDA’s recent Agricultural Land Values report , farmland values gained 12.4% in 2022 and are up a combined 20.2% over the past two years of bullish grain prices. (1) Yet ominous warning signs surround us in today’s uncertain economic environment.  Will recent market turbulence impact farmland values?  The U.S. economy is heading for turbulent times as stock prices swing, swelling housing prices reverse course, and 40-year high inflation forces the U.S. Federal Reserve to aggressively increase interest rates . The last time inflation was this high back in the 1980s (2), U.S. farm bankruptcies were widespread and farmland values plummeted. Fortunately, while farmland as an asset class is also influenced by interest rates, it often has less connectivity to broader economic signals and can therefore be somewhat insulated from the stiff headwinds plaguing the U.S. economy. Recent data from the USDA shows U.S. farmland values actually increased 12.4% between June 2021 and June 2022, but the future of such values still remains uncertain. As clouds loom over the U.S. economy, will they cast a shadow on the future of farmland’s impressive value growth to this point?   Get the free report Get insight from FBN® experts in the latest FBN Research publication. Get your free copy today.   Members can access this report and more in the Reports section of the FBN app. Capitalize on market opportunities with land loans from FBN Financial With U.S. farmland values looking up, it’s a great time to finance your farmland at a great rate with an experienced team that knows ag. By offering a new ag lending solution, FBN empowers farmers with flexible financing options to support their operation by providing competitive rates, a simple online application process, and exceptional service from loan advisors who average 15 years of ag finance experience.  To get your rate, simply apply online today or contact an FBN financial advisor to assist in completing your application.  Sources: USDA Ag Land Values August 2022. “Taking a look back at the 1980s farm crisis and it's impacts”. Farm Progress, August 22, 2016 . Copyright © 2014 - 2022 Farmer's Business Network, Inc. All rights Reserved. The sprout logo, “Farmers Business Network” and “FBN” are trademarks, registered trademarks or service marks of Farmer's Business Network, Inc. Financing offered by FBN Finance, LLC and its lending partners. Terms and conditions apply. To qualify, a borrower must be a member of Farmer’s Business Network, Inc. and meet all underwriting requirements. Interest rates and fees will vary depending on your individual situation. Not all applicants will qualify. Terms and conditions apply. Land financing offered by FBN Finance, LLC, provided in connection with Farmer Mac and our underwriting partners, and is available only where FBN Finance, LLC is licensed. To qualify, a borrower must be a member of Farmer’s Business Network, Inc., and meet the underwriting requirements of FBN Finance, LLC and its lending partners. All credit is subject to approval and underwriting. Interest rates and fees will vary depending on your individual situation. Not all applicants will qualify.


Aug 08, 2022

by Heather Stone

Farmers like you have a lot to think about everyday. Weather, crop yield, market prices, chemical usage and government policies are all elements you have to plan for and consider in your operations.  While thinking about your livelihood and the uncertainties that can affect profitability, safety risks are often deprioritized. Statistically, farming is one of the most hazardous occupations. According to the National Institute of Safety and Health (NIOSH)” in 2019, 410 farmers and farm workers died from a work-related injury, resulting in a fatality rate of 19.4 deaths per 100,000 workers.” Ultimately, injuries and illnesses have the potential to harm colleagues and family members you work alongside. These injuries also have the potential to result in major costs to your farm's bottom line. Insurance is an operating cost that you likely see every month on your balance sheet.  Crop insurance, workers compensation insurance, livestock insurance and health insurance for your family are all examples. Insurance premiums typically rise with the frequency and cost of claims.  Even a minor accident can involve time, money, people and resources which can impact current and future operations. Create a strong safety culture on your farm You have a huge responsibility as a farmer to ensure the safety of your operation, whether it’s you and a few seasonal workers or a larger scale operation.Your workers place their safety and health in your hands. Your leadership and the culture you create on your farm will help ensure your team goes home safely to their family each evening.  Here are a few simple steps you can take to build a strong safety culture on on your farm, while also reducing costs to your bottom line: 1. Start each day with a safety moment Talk to your employees about the tasks that will be performed during the day, review the risks involved and discuss what steps will be taken to reduce those risks. Encourage each employee to speak up and share stories and ideas. Talking about safety to start the work day only takes a few moments, but sends a message about how much you prioritize safety.  2. Encourage employees to speak up Are safety concerns openly discussed on your farm? Are workers encouraged to speak up without fear of punishment, ridicule or dismissal? The more employees are encouraged to speak up, the more opportunities you will have to identify an issue before it becomes an accident. 3. Focus on the cause, not the person Often when an incident occurs we are quick to blame. The truth is, people do make mistakes, but it’s not intentional. Most mistakes happen because we didn’t set the employee up for success. Was the training adequate? Was the workload acceptable? Were there other stresses (e.g. weather, time of day, etc.) that contributed to the accident? By focusing on what caused the individual to fail, you can make improvements that will drive success. 4. Make safety part of everyone’s job The National Agricultural Tractor Safety initiative reports, “ Tractors cause about 130 deaths annually ”  Equipment and facilities on the farm should be inspected regularly. Get your team involved in these inspections and coach them on the hazards they should be looking for. From a wasp nest in an overhang to a pinch point on a sprayer, the more they look for hazards, the greater the chance they can avoid — or eliminate — them. 5. Recognize good behaviors Your employees look up to you and model your behaviors. If an employee is taking a few minutes to get a sip of water on a hot day, use it as a chance to thank them for staying hydrated. If an employee is wearing chemical gloves while pouring a pesticide, call out that good behavior. Most importantly, recognize employees who are willing to speak up and bring safety concerns or ideas forward. Never underestimate the power of a “thank you.” You never know when a suggestion may save a life on your farm.  Everyone can be a leader when it comes to safety. It only takes a few small actions, good or bad, to impact the safety culture on your farm. Creating a culture of caring on your farm ensures all employees are looking out for themselves and each other to ensure the work gets done… safely. It also helps you rest better at night knowing your team is home safe with their families and will be ready for work the next day. Additional resources 11 Tips for Farm Safety 5 ways to be proactive about farm safety  Safety on the Farm: Prepare. Prevent. Protect Copyright © 2014 - 2022 Farmer's Business Network, Inc. All rights Reserved. The sprout logo, “Farmers Business Network”, “FBN”, "Farmers First" and “FBN Direct” are trademarks or registered trademarks of Farmer's Business Network, Inc. 


Aug 08, 2022

by Lucas Strom

When FBN® members told us that they need better healthcare options for their families and farm employees, we listened. In 2018, we launched FBN Health to bring farmers more choice around their healthcare options with plans that are designed for them—straightforward, affordable and reliable health benefits with best-in-class service when you need it most. Farming is a tough business. One of the greatest potential risks you manage is your own health and personal wellness, as well as that of your family and employees—but you don’t have to do it alone. We’ve tailored health benefits plans to meet FBN members’ needs with a farmer-focused healthcare coverage offering, which includes enhanced ambulance coverage. Healthcare designed for farm operations You need the freedom to choose from a range of healthcare coverage options that meet your farm’s specific needs. We have four different plans that offer you: Health coverage for your family and your farm employees: Medical, dental and vision Free, 24/7 telephone access to a doctor—at $0 co-pay—so you don’t have to waste any time driving to town when you have a medical question or need Extensive regional and national networks of providers based across the country Affordable health benefits for farming businesses You don’t have to settle for the rising cost of health coverage. By leveraging the purchasing power of the FBN network, we are working to lower health insurance premiums and pass those savings straight on to you. In many cases, we expect eligible FBN members will see significant premium savings over the individual marketplace. The plans offered through FBN Health are level-funded plans which are fully underwritten, allowing them to provide much lower rates for relatively healthy members of your family or farm employees. Between our unique approach and the power of the FBN network, members may see 25-35 percent savings under the right circumstances. Simple to choose and easy to use You deserve hassle-free health insurance. Lower-cost healthcare options should also be convenient to access and use when you need them, and come with hassle-free support. You shouldn’t have to spend valuable time re-learning the ever-changing landscape of the healthcare industry, benefits options and network providers—through our partnership, we’re making the enrollment and selection process easy, and the benefits service you receive after the sale outstanding. How to participate in FBN Health Farms with as few as one employee who have a Federal ID Number (FEIN) are eligible to apply.  The online application takes about 30 minutes to complete and can be found at FBNHealth.com . Our team is staffed by licensed health insurance experts to help you make the right coverage decisions for your family and operation. We will walk you through the application and enrollment process and be there to answer any claims questions throughout the year. Where is FBN Health Offered? FBN Health is available in all 50 states. Are you unhappy with your healthcare coverage?  Does your family farm have the best option for health insurance?  Call 877-892-3303 or visit FBNHealth.com to apply. FBN does not offer traditional health insurance. But while we do not offer traditional health insurance, we do offer FBN Health. FBN Health is marketed by FBN Insurance LLC. FBN Insurance LLC is not a licensed insurance company or agency and its employees and representatives are not licensed life and health insurance agents. Policies marketed by FBN Health are level-funded group health benefit plans offered and administered by Benefit Plan Administrators, Inc. (“BPA”) and Employers Business Alliance ("EBA") and available only where BPA and EBA are licensed." If you submit the Get A Quote Form, a licensed insurance agent/producer may contact you on behalf of BPA or EBA. You cannot obtain coverage under a health plan until you complete and submit an application for the plan and your application is approved and accepted by BPA or EBA. Eligibility and benefit exclusions and limitations apply. FBN Health is currently available in all 50 states.


Aug 05, 2022

by Anthony Stibbard

We’ve all heard of Net Blotch but most of us have struggled to control it in the past. Once those pesky dark blotches appear on barley leaves, you know things can become difficult from here on out. Fortunately, there are some key points to manage and reduce symptoms and help minimise yield and grain quality reduction. There are 2 strains of net blotch, Spot Form Net Blotch (SFNB) and Net Form Net Blotch (NFNB). Both are closely related and have the potential to cause significant yield loss if the crop becomes infected. Increase in barley production across the country has tightened the barley rotation and caused the disease to become more widespread, particularly in medium to high rainfall areas.  Before planting barley it is important to understand the disease resistance of your particular variety of barley. Sowing guides are available to give an indication of disease risk amongst certain varieties and this should be a go to resource pre-season. The information in The NSW Winter Crop Variety Sowing Guide is updated each year and provides fantastic variety specific detail. Most States in Australia will provide something similar to give you basic information on pre-sowing decisions for your region. Once you understand your variety susceptibility, it is important to understand the paddock risk. Avoid double cropping barley in the same paddock as the inoculum will survive on the stubble and reinfect the subsequent crop. The surviving spores on the stubble are also spread by wind, so it is important to monitor crops grown adjacent to last year's barley stubble as these crops are considered higher risk to developing the disease.  Once the decision has been made on variety and paddock it is important to apply a fungicide at the point of sowing. Seed dressing such as Systiva® have a registration for management of net blotch and in furrow fungicides should also be considered.  Effective use of foliar fungicides  Before applying foliar fungicides it is important to understand how the disease works. Net Blotch is what is considered a necrotrophic disease, meaning the infected plant tissue eventually dies. Most fungicides have limited translocation (movement) within the plant. However, when the tissue dies (which is the case with net blotch), no translocation occurs meaning it is very difficult to get fungicide into the site of infection. This reinforces the importance of understanding the risk profile of the variety and the paddock and if there is risk of infection, foliar fungicides should be applied before visible symptoms appear within the crop. Consult your local agronomist to pre-determine a growth stage for application. An application of around GS1-32 is generally recommended, but this will vary depending on the risk profile, seed treatment, weather conditions etc..  When it comes to application, rotating modes of action is important as net blotch has shown to build resistance to certain fungicide groups. There are a number of products which hold a registration for control or suppression of net form and spot form of net blotch. Ensure you read the product label carefully to determine the fungicide is effective on the form of net blotch you are looking to control, it is also important to check withholding periods.  Consult your local agronomist for timing, rates and product but research has found that propiconazole , prothioconazole, azoxystrobin and epoxiconazole based fungicides have shown to provide better efficacy on net blotch than tebuconazole based fungicides. To get a better understanding of fungicide activity Crop Life Australia provide a great table to reference. Keep in mind that if the disease is already present in the crop, suppression is only likely and a second application may be required in high rainfall areas.  Grain Research & Development Corporation (GRDC) is continuing their work in determining the resistance profile of the disease, if you believe you have a resistance problem get in contact with your agronomist ASAP to determine the strategy moving forward. Resources: https://www.croplife.org.au/resources/programs/resistance-management/fungicide-activity-group-table-2-draft/ Copyright © 2021 - 2022 Farmers Business Network Australia Pty Ltd. All rights Reserved. The sprout logo, "FBN", "Farmers Business Network", and "FBN Direct" are registered trademarks or trademarks of Farmer's Business Network, Inc. FBN Direct products and services and other products distributed by FBN Direct are offered by Farmers Business Network Australia Pty. Ltd. and are available only where Farmers Business Network Australia Pty Ltd. is licensed and where those products are registered for sale or use, if applicable. Nothing contained on this page, including the prices listed should be construed as an offer for sale, or a sale of products. All products and prices are subject to change at any time and without notice. Terms and conditions apply. ALWAYS READ AND FOLLOW LABEL DIRECTIONS. It is a violation of federal and state/territory law to use any pesticide other than in accordance with its label. The distribution, sale and use of an unregistered chemical product is a violation of federal and/or state/territory law and is strictly prohibited. We do not guarantee the accuracy of any information provided on this page or which is provided by us in any form. It is your responsibility to confirm prior to purchase and use that a product is labeled for your specific purposes, including, but not limited to, your target crop or pest and its compatibility with other products in a tank mix and that the usage of a product is otherwise consistent with federal, state, territory and local laws. We reserve the right to restrict sales on a geographic basis in our sole discretion. You must be authorised to use restricted chemical products under applicable state or territory law. Please consult your applicable state or territory authority for complete rules and regulations on the use of restricted chemical products as some products require specific record-keeping requirements. All product recommendations and other information provided is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for consulting the product label or for specific agronomic, business,or professional advice. Where specific advice is necessary or appropriate, consult with a qualified advisor. Neither Farmer's Business Network Australia PTY Ltd nor any of its affiliates makes any representations or warranties, express or implied, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in the material and any liability therefore is expressly disclaimed.


Aug 02, 2022

by Jeff Vanrobaeys

Have you thought about using a desiccant for your pulse crops and canola? Using a desiccant on crops promotes rapid, more uniform crop dry down, helping maximize harvestability. Benefits of using FBN® Diquat 240 as a dessicant product 1. Crop quality Desiccation ensures a quicker, more complete dry down maintaining crop quality, with a more uniform sample and less issues affecting grade. 2. Timely uniform harvest All areas of the field are dry and ready to harvest at the same time, enabling more acres to be harvested each day, helping to maximizing harvest efficiency. 3. Straight cutting  Especially with pod-shatter resistant canola, it better facilitates straight cutting, making the entire field more uniformly harvestable. Optimizing the application of a dessicant 1. Use a surfactant FBN has some excellent surfactant options to use with Diquat 240. Both are registered for use with FBN Diquat 240 at 0.1% V./V. or 1 liter per 1000 liters. Falcon® is a product with similar properties to LI700® but is registered at  a lower  use rate of 0.1% V./V. Icon® is a product with similar properties to Agral 90®, and is registered as a wetter and spreading agent with FBN Diquat 240, as well as a tank cleaner. 2. Application Timing Diquat is typically activated by sunlight, so for best coverage apply in cloudy weather or during the evening. Desiccation is not a method of weed control, but rather a harvest aid. If weed control is an issue, FBN has several options as well, and these can be used alone or in conjunction with FBN Diquat 240®. Shop now Check out FBN Direct® to learn more about our full range of crop protection products.  Copyright © 2015 - 2022 Farmer's Business Network Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. The sprout logo, "Farmers Business Network," "FBN,", "Farmers First", "FBN Direct," "F2F Genetics Network", the Pro Ag logo, "Pro Ag", and "Professional Ag Distributors" are trademarks or registered trademarks of Farmer's Business Network, Inc. or its affiliates.  FBN Direct products and services and other products distributed by FBN Direct are offered by Farmer's Business Network Canada, Inc. and are available only in provinces where Farmer's Business Network Canada, Inc. is licensed and where those products are registered for sale or use, if applicable. Not available in Quebec. Nothing contained on this page, including the prices listed should be construed as an offer for sale, or a sale of products. All products and prices are subject to change at any time and without notice. Terms and conditions apply. ALWAYS READ AND FOLLOW LABEL DIRECTIONS. It is a violation of federal and provincial law to use any pest control product other than in accordance with its label. The distribution, sale and use of an unregistered pest control product is a violation of federal and/or provincial law and is strictly prohibited. We do not guarantee the accuracy of any information provided on this page or which is provided by us in any form. It is your responsibility to confirm prior to purchase and use that a product is labeled for your specific purposes, including, but not limited to, your target crop or pest and its compatibility with other products in a tank mix and that the usage of a product is otherwise consistent with federal, provincial and local laws.  We reserve the right to restrict sales on a geographic basis in our sole discretion. You must have a valid applicator license and/or be a certified farmer, to use restricted and commercial pest control products (exceptions may apply based on province).  Please consult your applicable provincial authority for complete rules and regulations on licensing, use, and recording keeping requirements of restricted and commercial pest control products. The material provided is for educational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for specific agronomic, business, legal, investment or professional advice. Where specific advice is necessary or appropriate, consult with a qualified agronomist, financial planner, or investment manager. Neither Farmer's Business Network Canada, Inc. nor any of its affiliates makes any representations or warranties, express or implied, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in the material and any liability therefore is expressly disclaimed.


Aug 02, 2022

by Bill Prince

August 2 Update During the past several weeks we have experienced the effects of weather on the commodity markets. We are seeing dramatic price swings based on a hot/dry forecast to a cooler/wetter forecast. It’s been a challenging time to plan and market your grain. I was recently speaking to someone who indicated they missed out on making a sale before markets closed for the day; the next day, markets prices had dropped $.50. Bill Prince is your Market Advisor Regional Representative serving members east of the Mississippi River - Alabama, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia and Wisconsin. Click here to download Bill’s virtual business card Working with FBN Market Advisory provides you with a systematic approach to selling grain. Our brokerage services can assist in making decisions to protect you from falling prices and defend sales already made. We would be happy to discuss your situation if you have questions. Conditions have greatly improved in the Eastern corn belt. In talking with a producer in Indiana, he was looking at a below average corn crop in mid-July. A series of timely rains moved through, and it looks totally different. Soybeans are looking better as well. Plants are growing taller and blooming/setting pods. However, there are pockets of less than stellar conditions and we have a few weeks of development to go. As always, call if you have questions - scan the QR Code above or click the link to download my business card. Below are recent soybean and corn yields estimates from FBN®. Upcoming events Check out these upcoming events in our region.  For more details click here. July 21 Update Traveling to Central Illinois I was surprised at how well the corn crop looked. I expected to see drought-stricken plants and that was not the case, that is not to say moisture isn’t welcome. Yes, it is a tale of two crops as the early planted corn is pollinating and the later planted is a couple weeks behind. Indiana and Ohio have been struggling with a lack of moisture as noted in the crop condition scores. The recent rains have helped but producers I’ve talked with say it isn’t enough. As of this writing, scattered rain is in the forecast through early August.  Soybeans have shown signs of stress as well. Most are hoping that August will bring conditions favorable to development. One producer commented that even though plants are small, there appears to be a good number of nodes. Part of what we do as market advisors/brokers is talking with producers regarding their livestock especially cattle and how they manage the price volatility in the cattle market. FBN Crop insurance agents have Livestock Risk Protection (LRP) policy which is a federally-subsidized insurance program used to lock in a floor price for your cattle and protect against a price decline in the marketplace. Producers need to be flexible and proactive in managing their price risk and LRP offers that opportunity. If you would like to learn more about this product and how to manage your risk, contact your local market advisor who can get you in touch with one of our experienced FBN Crop insurance agents. Hit and miss rains have led to varying drought indications throughout the country. It's no surprise crop health throughout the region is varying so much. The below NASA Grace map provides a great visual of soil moisture inconsistencies throughout the country (white indicated normal soil moistures levels during this time of the year with colors on the red spectrum indicating drought level and blue spectrum indicating elevated soil moisture levels). Source: NASA , https://nasagrace.unl.edu/   FBN Market Advisory services are offered by FBN BR LLC, dba FBN Brokerage, FBN BR and FBN Market Advisory - NFA ID: 0508695 Disclaimer: The views and opinions are solely those of the author as of the date of publication, are subject to change at any time due to market or economic conditions, will not be updated or supplemented after the date hereof and may not necessarily come to pass. The views and opinions expressed herein do not reflect those of all personnel at FBN BR LLC (FBN) or the views of the Farmer's Business Network Inc. as a whole. FBN makes no representations, warranties, or guarantees as to this content. Any charts and graphs provided are for illustrative purposes only. Any performance quoted represents past performance. Past performance does not guarantee future results. All investments involve risks, including the possible loss of principal. Commodity trading, including futures, hedging and speculating, involves substantial risk of loss and may not be suitable for everyone. Past performance is not necessarily indicative of future results. All information, publications, and reports, including this specific material, used and distributed by FBN BR LLC shall be construed as a solicitation. The information and data provided comes from sources believed to be reliable but FBN BR LLC does not guarantee its accuracy or completeness.  We are an Equal Opportunity Provider. FBN Crop Insurance services are offered by FBN Insurance LLC (dba FBN Insurance Solutions Services LLC in Texas, and FBN Insurance Solutions LLC in California and Michigan) and are only available where FBN Insurance LLC is licensed. FBN membership is not required to purchase through FBN Insurance LLC, but certain features are only available to FBN members. FBN Crop Insurance is currently offered in all U.S. states except MA and the District of Columbia. Copyright © 2014-2022 Farmer's Business Network, Inc. The sprout logo, "Farmers Business Network," "FBN," and "Farmers First" are registered trademarks of Farmer's Business Network, Inc. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.


Aug 02, 2022

by Diana DeHart

August 2 Update Much needed rains fell across portions of the region over the past two weeks, although the rains were widely scattered.  Extremely hot temperatures enveloped most of the region as well, stressing thirsty crops. Diana DeHart is your Market Advisor Regional Representative serving members in the Western Farm Belt, West and Southwestern United States - Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Iowa, Kansas, Louisiana, Missouri, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas and Utah. Click here to download Diana’s virtual business card. On July 24 I traveled from KC, MO north to St. Paul, MN via I-35. Crop conditions looked relatively good along the way, with a few small pockets of slight dryness in several counties near south/central Iowa. Temps along this route were warm, but not excessive, and crops were green and making up for lost time from late plantings.  I traveled from KC, MO to Ft. Smith, AR on July 29; from there, on to College Station, TX. Conditions got visibly dryer as I traveled south of KC into northern AR. Many of the cattlemen in Western Arkansas have begun liquidating their herds as dryness has increased recently. There were some scattered showers in the western parts of Arkansas and eastern Texas this past weekend, but nothing widespread or significant enough to relieve drought issues.  This week I am attending the Texas A&M Beef Short Course in College Station. The biggest topic of the  program was the drought and how to manage the operation in spite of it, along with higher input costs. Weather outlooks do not look promising, according to some meteorologists, and their view of an intact La Niña system. If you haven’t explored what PRF (Pasture, Range & Forage) or LRP (Livestock Risk Protection) can do for you and your livestock operation, please give one of our Insurance Agents a call.  Learn how these government subsidized programs, or utilizing a brokerage account for hedging, can help protect your bottom line and your operation. Below are recent soybean and corn yields estimates from FBN®. Upcoming events Check out these upcoming events in our region.  For more details click here. July 21 Update  Wheat harvest is wrapping up in most areas in my region and, for the most part, quality has been very good for both Hard and Soft Wheat this year. Yields have varied depending on location. Soft wheat areas have seen average to slightly above average yields while Hard wheat areas were all mostly below average yields with some fields a total loss due to drought conditions.   Corn and soybean conditions are a mixed bag in this region as well. Crops in most of Iowa, parts of Nebraska and Northwest Missouri look really good. Although slightly behind average, they have had good amounts of moisture and plenty of GDUs that have helped the crops gain in maturity given some of the late planting dates. Conditions deteriorate as we move south and west, however. Even in Missouri where NW MO crops look great, we only have to travel a few hours east or south to find drought-stressed crops in need of a drink and some cooler temps.  Traveling south and west through Kansas we see the same situation, dryland crops under stress (dead in some areas) and even irrigated crops struggling to keep up with the 100+ degree days and too warm of temps at night. Currently the grain market is taking the attitude that the “I” states are improving enough that they will offset losses from states like Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas. Time will tell if that is the case, but many years we won’t see the market accept anything below the USDA estimated yield until after the harvest is in the bins and the bin doors are shut in the fall.   The drought in parts of this region is not only impacting crop production, but also livestock production. As the southwest is salvaging severely drought stricken corn where possible for forage/feed use, we have seen a great number of cattle sold this summer due to lack of grass/feed. Part of what we do as market advisors/brokers is talk with producers regarding their livestock, especially cattle, and how they manage price volatility in the cattle market. In addition to, or instead of using futures and options, FBN can work with livestock growers to protect prices using the Livestock Risk Protection (LRP) policy. This is a federally-subsidized insurance program used to lock in a floor price for your cattle and protect against a price decline in the marketplace. Producers need flexibility while being proactive in managing their price risk and LRP offers that opportunity. FBN has Crop Insurance agents licensed to write LRP policies. If you would like to learn more about this product and how to manage your risk, contact your local market advisor who can get you in touch with one of our experienced FBN Crop insurance agents. Hit and miss rains have led to varying drought indications throughout the country. It's no surprise crop health throughout the region is varying so much. The below NASA Grace map provides a great visual of soil moisture inconsistencies throughout the country (white indicated normal soil moistures levels during this time of the year with colors on the red spectrum indicating drought level and blue spectrum indicating elevated soil moisture levels). Source: NASA , https://nasagrace.unl.edu/   Upcoming events Check out these upcoming events in our region.  For more details click here. Oklahoma Cattlemen's Association - Norman, OK, July 22-23 Arkansas Cattlemen's Association - Hot Springs, AR, July 28-30 Texas A&M Beef Short Course - College Station, TX, August 1-3 Coming County Fair (stop by our booth!) - West Point, NE, August 11-14 Community Builder events in the following locations: Fort Dodge, IA, July 12 Huxley, IA, July 13 Keystone, IA, July 14 Anita, IA, July 19 Independence, IA, July 20 Monticello, IA, July 28 Perry, IA, August 4 Marshalltown, IA, August 9 Grinnell, IA, August 10 FBN Market Advisory services are offered by FBN BR LLC, dba FBN Brokerage, FBN BR and FBN Market Advisory - NFA ID: 0508695 Disclaimer: The views and opinions are solely those of the author as of the date of publication, are subject to change at any time due to market or economic conditions, will not be updated or supplemented after the date hereof and may not necessarily come to pass. The views and opinions expressed herein do not reflect those of all personnel at FBN BR LLC (FBN) or the views of the Farmer's Business Network Inc. as a whole. FBN makes no representations, warranties, or guarantees as to this content. Any charts and graphs provided are for illustrative purposes only. Any performance quoted represents past performance. Past performance does not guarantee future results. All investments involve risks, including the possible loss of principal. Commodity trading, including futures, hedging and speculating, involves substantial risk of loss and may not be suitable for everyone. Past performance is not necessarily indicative of future results. All information, publications, and reports, including this specific material, used and distributed by FBN BR LLC shall be construed as a solicitation. The information and data provided comes from sources believed to be reliable but FBN BR LLC does not guarantee its accuracy or completeness.  We are an Equal Opportunity Provider. FBN Crop Insurance services are offered by FBN Insurance LLC (dba FBN Insurance Solutions Services LLC in Texas, and FBN Insurance Solutions LLC in California and Michigan) and are only available where FBN Insurance LLC is licensed. FBN membership is not required to purchase through FBN Insurance LLC, but certain features are only available to FBN members. FBN Crop Insurance is currently offered in all U.S. states except MA and the District of Columbia. Copyright © 2014-2022 Farmer's Business Network, Inc. The sprout logo, "Farmers Business Network," "FBN," and "Farmers First" are registered trademarks of Farmer's Business Network, Inc. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.