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Welcome to FBN Resources. Your central place to stay up to date on the latest content including reports, videos, blog articles and more created by FBN experts and geared toward the future of farming, supporting better agricultural practices and helping put Farmers First.

Resource Library

Resource Library

Jun 24, 2022

by Kevin McNew

After a steady climb over the past six months from $5.50 to $7.50 a bushel for the bellwether December 2022 futures contract, the past three weeks have seen relative choppy trade keeping prices hovering around the low $7 mark.  USDA’s acreage report at the end of June along with US growing season weather will be key drivers for deciding if futures can reach new highs heading into harvest. Likewise, basis levels for fall delivery will be adjusting as we get closer to harvest and estimates of new supplies start to dial in. Current cash forward contracts which quote new-crop basis for delivery this fall have been generally trending higher in the Western Cornbelt but flat to a bit lower in the Eastern Cornbelt. Last year had big corn crops, especially in Ohio and Indiana, which has kept spot basis levels in those states below normal for much of the past six months. Meanwhile in the West, dryness in the Plains and lack of grain supplies has underpinned spot basis for much of the year.  Is this a good time to be locking in the new-crop basis for delivery at harvest? Or would you be better off waiting for new-crop basis to improve? To answer that, we examined 2006-2021 basis bids at harvest for key states and developed our Basis Model to help guide marketing decisions. This model is tuned into a number of factors like US and local production, stocks, ethanol, and exports and gives a basis forecast based on the expected supply and demand situation for this fall.  The results of the forecasts are presented in the chart below for 15 key states. In addition, we illustrate the current year new-crop basis averaged across buyers to compare whether current basis offerings are above or below expected basis levels at harvest. Of the 15 states, only 2 states (KY and MO) show current new-crop basis quotes that are at or below the forecast value for the state. Most states have forecast basis that not only is higher than current quoted basis for that state, but that also is above the long-run average basis at harvest. The key drivers of this are declining US carryout expected for 2022 as well as fairly sizable changes in local production due to acreage changes between 2021 and what is expected in 2022. If USDA were to find even lower acreage in the June survey, and/or if yield potential erodes over the season, then this could add more basis upside this fall. Falling production combined with near-record exports and ethanol production expected in 2022 likely keeps local basis supported heading into harvest, and yet another market where farmers are better off waiting to price on.  New-crop corn basis forecasts Click here to enlarge the image. What it means for the farmer A tightening US and global corn market is unlikely to get corrected in the next six months. Most end users are not eager to bid up basis for this fall, but as the growing season progresses we expect the corn crop size to continue to be downgraded, which likely opens doors for better basis opportunities closer to harvest than what exists today.


Jun 24, 2022

by Jess Sampson

Zinc deficiency in Australia is one of the most common micronutrient deficiencies in crops. Zinc deficiencies can occur on a wide range of soils, from heavy alkaline clay soils to light sandy acidic soils.  In crops, zinc is vital for the formation of chlorophyll and carbohydrates. It plays an important role in the movement of water in plants, aiding in root development and starch formation. Zinc is also essential in aiding the production of growth hormones such as Auxins.  The total amount of zinc in your soil can be directly related to the parent material, for example,  basalt soils can contain high levels of zinc, whereas sandy soils can be low in zinc. Although zinc in organic matter is fairly immobile and very little is leached from the soil, it is often not in a readily available form in the soil. There are many factors that can play a key role in the availability of zinc for plant uptake, such as: Organic matter - Zinc can interact with soil organic matter by forming both insoluble and soluble zinc complexes. It can be mineralised and made available to plants from decomposing organic matter.  The amount of chelating agents in the soil have a direct impact on the movement of Zinc. Chelating agents increase the solubility of zinc from the soil and aid its movement through to the roots of the plants. Climatic conditions can also play a role in zinc availability. A wet winter-spring season, like the one we are experiencing in Australia, can result in zinc deficiency in plants, this is a result of reduced microbiological activity. Microbiological activity is important to assist in releasing zinc from organic matter. Because of this waterlogging can tend to increase zinc deficiency. High levels of available iron can adversely affect the plants ability to take up zinc.  The incorrect application of phosphorus fertiliser may induce zinc deficiency, by affecting the physiological availability of zinc in plant tissues. It has been found that Vesicular arbuscular mycorrhiza (VAM) colonisation of plant roots is reduced in crops growing in soils high in phosphorus. That is why it is really important to know your soils and apply the correct fertiliser types and rates.  High water tables or soil compaction can affect plant root development. This can directly affect the dispersion of zinc in the soil, leading to zinc deficiency. VAM is a beneficial fungi which infects the roots of most crops (except canola). The mycelium (fungal threads) assist the plants ability to uptake immobile nutrients such as phosphorus and zinc, It does this by increasing the root surface area. VAM relies on plants for survival. Fallowing land for a long period, e.g. 12 months, or growing non-host crops (canola), can cause populations to decline, thus increasing the risk of zinc deficiency.  Some symptoms of zinc deficiency are: Brown or yellow patches on the new growth Patchy appearance of the crop Brown necrotic spots on the leaves Poor seed set – young tillers may die before setting seed Poor yield/low protein Zinc toxicity is uncommon, and is more likely to occur in acid soils. High levels of zinc can inhibit a plant's ability to uptake P and Fe.  Zinc as a foliar spray should be applied in small amounts, more regularly. Early in the morning or early evening to reduce evaporation and maximise the intake of zinc into the plant. Best results occur when applied before symptoms of deficiency are noticeable.  is a fully chelated form of zinc, making it both more efficient and effective to use. It mixes well with a wide range of liquid fertilisers, humates and chemicals. Cereals 0.5 - 2.5 3-5 leaf stage 50-100 Canola 0.5 - 2.5 4-9 True leaves 50-100 Legumes 0.5 - 2.5 10-14 days before flowering, sooner if a deficiency is known. 50-100 Pasture 0.5 - 2.5 Good leaf cover 50-100 Cotton 1 - 2.5 Prior to flowering 50-100 Grapevines 1 - 3 Flower bud visible & flower bud separated. 200-1000 Citrus 2 - 4 Spring, Summer, Autumn flush 500-1000 2 - 5 Soil application Sources: GRDC.com.au https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/earth-and-planetary-sciences/vesicular-arbuscular-mycorrhiza Impact Fertilisers Trace elements 1999


Jun 23, 2022

by Jeff Vanrobaeys

Many wheat growing geographies in Canada  have received substantial amounts of rain this spring, in addition to the challenges of preparing seed beds and planting, excessive rainfall can also fuel disease.  Given these conditions, and if they match in your area, this could be the right time to apply to wheat. (1) show that protecting the flag leaf of wheat, triticale, and oats from disease can assure 70 percent or higher of the crops yield potential. Plan to protect yields with a treatment when conditions align for the best chances to protect your crop from a likely pressure. In an anticipated high disease pressure year, consider applying a protective fungicide treatment to wheat. It is too late to make a preventative application, once disease pressure and damage is already visible within a field. Types of fungicide treatment A fungicide application  helps protect further damage to the plant and as a result can greatly impact yield. There are many types of wheat and small grain fungicides. Those fungicides that contain a strobilurin, such as azoxystrobin, (Group 11) or a triazole, such as triticonazole, (Group 3) are common choices for wheat growers. A combination of both Group 11 and Group 3 fungicides are commonly used as well. Products that contain  strobilurin should not be applied past anthesis as it can increase the DON level of grain.  is an excellent option to apply after flowering.  One of the major advantages of prothio - teb is the product is both a contact and systemic fungicide so as result the product has great curative and preventative properties. Always scout early for leaf diseases, FBN® has great fungicide options from flag leaf to flowering stage of development. Sources (1) University of Nebraska Crop Watch  https://cropwatch.unl.edu/2018/wheat-disease-update


Jun 23, 2022

by Mark Wilson

Last week, the Federal Reserve hiked its interest rate by 0.75% in an effort to combat inflation. And while markets are expecting a similar rate hike in the not too distant future, this is a first step to decelerate inflation which is at its highest in the last 40 years.  According to Kevin McNew, Chief Economist at FBN®, the Fed will need to do more interest rate hikes in the next 6-12 months. Join Dan English, General Manager of FBN® Finance and Kevin McNew as they discuss why the Federal Reserve decided to hike interest rates, what that means for farmers and how can help alleviate some of the uncertainties of a fast changing economy.  What you’ll learn Click on the chapter links within the video to jump to each section: Why the Fed increased interest rates (00:10) What farmers should focus on (04:39) Why to consider Farmland Capital (05:24) What’s happening in the energy market (08:05) What it means for farmers (11:48) Watch now Solutions to grow your business Farmland Capital Farmland Capital provides you the capital you need without impacting your original loan. Learn more here or start your application today . Operating lines Inflation is impacting everyone. Operating lines will help you fund your operation as you see fit. Apply today and get your approval decision instantly. Land loans Rising interest rates might not impact your decision to purchase the perfect land. We want to help you finance your dream, apply for a land loan now . Crop insurance Inflation is impactful and everything counts. Protect your crop commodity and learn more about our personalized crop insurance solutions . Read the full transcript (00:00): I'm Dan English. I'm the general manager of FBN® Finance. And I'm here today with Chief Economist Dr. Kevin McNew. Hi Kevin. (00:08): Hey Dan, how are you doing? (00:10): Good. Well I think as a lot of people have seen now last week, the Federal Reserve hiked interest rates quite a bit.  And I think even a little bit more than what had been expected, maybe two or three weeks before that. Maybe could you just walk me through what the news was that prompted the Federal Reserve to raise rates and what that means? (00:32): I think the Fed is realizing that they got a late start to this inflation issue. You know, a lot of us in the economic world have been saying for the last year that inflation is a problem and they're just now kind of getting their act together.  And they did need to raise interest rates a quarter of a point more than what was maybe expected, but absolutely it's needed.  We have inflation that is well over 8%, 8.6%, according to the last reading, which is  at or above the highest rates we've seen in over 40 years. So the Fed has a lot of work to do. I don't think this is the end of the inflation or the interest rate hike story.  Markets are already kind of expecting another similar magnitude rate hike in the next meeting next month and probably another half a point gain before the end of the year. So yeah, we've got some interest rate movement company to curb this runaway inflation, (01:33): Do you think that the Fed is going to be acting like this is aggressive enough? Or do you think that they'll have to continually revise upward what they're doing to be able to combat inflation? (01:46): Normally, the Fed is really trying to watch inflation, unemployment, the economy, and really in the last 30, 40 years, we haven't worried too much about inflation. And so having to watch inflation is a new issue. The Fed's going to  have to deal with it.  And, and like I said, they got a late start to it, obviously because of the issues around COVID. And I think they're going to  be laser focused on what inflation is doing as a result of raising interest rates. They don't wanna put the economy in a recession, but their number one priority right now is tamping down this inflation that is just really problematic for the economy going forward.  So I think it's all going to  be about inflation readings as we get new data coming out. We're going to  see some pull back and economic activity and surging prices. I personally don't think we're, we're going to  be seeing something really quickly. That's going to  change the Fed's outlook, which is they're going to need to do more rather than less in the next six to 12 months. (02:54): Do you expect that raising rates, dialing back their bond buying program, all, all the efforts that they're doing to have more restrictive monetary policy that's longer or your interest and higher, you know, baseline expectations for years to come? (03:18): That's a tough one, Dan. I mean, because some of this is definitely, you know, policy related. I was a huge proponent of you the Fed being more aggressive about interest rate hikes shortly you know, six months to a year after COVID because we did inject such fiscal stimulus into the economy and that's now having, you know, profound impacts.  But beyond that, we have what's going on in Eastern Europe, issues with energy prices and all these external exogenous forces that are really out of the Fed's hands. And so, they're trying to do this through a series of interest rate hikes and, and quantitative tightening to kind of throttle back the system, but, there's more action in the global market than the Fed can realistically control.  From your standpoint, as you kind of see and, and see what's going on in the agricultural lending space, I'd be curious if we're in this interest rate environment for the next two to three years, where should we be telling our farmers to focus on?  Should we be focusing on long term debt consolidation? You know, all those kinds of things about investment decisions become so important in this environment. (04:39): It depends a lot on the farmer's personal situation, their balance sheet. But one thing that we encouraged a lot of people to do and worked with a lot of farmers to do over the last year to two years, was to refinance at these lower rates before the most recent rate hikes.  For folks who have done that, they have a very different problem going forward, which is they have an amortizing loan that they're paying off every year where they have a very low rate. And how do they replace that? How do they cover the additional incremental costs as they, you know, either refinance that to take some cash out down the road or come in with higher and more expensive sources of debt. (05:24): One thing we're encouraging a lot of people to look at is we have a Farmland Capital program where we can take a second position and they can keep the first position in place.  At the low rate, we think that's going to  be a great option for a lot of farmers. But more generally, I would say the risk of this going even higher still seems pretty significant to us.  And just the pace at which the rates have increased over the last six months has really been astounding. I think where folks can lock in rates for the next 10, 20, 30 years, and have some certainty that they're going to  be able to remain profitable. We're encouraging folks to do that.  If rates come back down they can always prepay and refinance at a lower rate, but where they can lock in longer term, we think that's definitely the right thing now. (06:13): As I think back long term, I've been farming all my life and in the ‘80s as a farm kid, I remember the interconnectedness of coming of the ‘70s, roaring with bull markets.  The ‘80s brought hyperinflation and land values going through the roof. And then in the early ‘80s was a big farm depression. I know there's many gray-haired farmers out there that have the kind of experience that have seen these kinds of ebbs and flows.  What I've been telling them as it relates to farmland is I don't think we have a huge downturn in farmland values, and we don't see a huge recession or depression even in commodity prices, because it's a much different story today than it was in the ‘80s where we had oversupply issues. This is not that situation. We don't have an oversupply issue.  We have an over demand issue and commodity prices may back down a little bit but I think farmland values don't tank and bottom out or, or turn south quite sharply. If there's ways to capture more farmland as they fall down, or in your case you mentioned the Farmland Capital situation, that's a really intriguing concept. (07:31): I think for farmers who are looking who may be concerned about that, that's a way for them to take a little bit of risk off the table while still being able to have upside control and ownership of their farm.  One thing that we're paying very close attention to on the financing side is will farmers be able to support their farm at these, you know, lower prices? Maybe you can just talk a little bit about what the forward curve of green prices are doing. And it sounds like you think some of these prices are here to stay for at least a little while. (08:05): They're definitely catching up as we get more permanency around the demand side of the story. A lot depends on energy markets and I don't think the energy situation is going to improve dramatically.  Obviously, a lot depends on the situation in Eastern Europe. Overall we're in a much different energy paradigm.We're trying to make this global transition from fossil fuel based energy to clean energy. And that's not a simple, easy solution. It's going to involve a lot of volatility. And I think this is just the start of what will be at least another decade of volatility in the energy markets, which in my opinion means more benefits for agriculture as we are linked in the biofuel space.  For 15 years we've been linked with ethanol but now there's such a big push around renewable diesel and that translates into demand for soybeans, for example. So I don't see a ton of downside risk, as I said, it's not to say we won't have ups and downs. But the forward curves are starting to look better and catch up. I do think the days of $3 corn and $8 beans are probably pretty far behind us until something dramatically shifts either in the energy sector or other other places. But there's just so much pin up demand if you will. (09:33): That's great news for our farmers. And one thing that I know a lot of people see as one of the drivers of energy is the war in Ukraine and the resulting markets. It sounds like even if that were resolved tomorrow, we're talking about more fundamental issues than the short term issues.. (10:00): Economists will call it a knife edge solution as we try to transition from fossil fuels to clean energy. A knife edge is really razor thin. And so a nice, smooth transition is very hard to achieve because there's so much imbalance.  Just to give you some perspective, since COVID, we have seen a downgrade in refining capacity in the U.S. and that's not out of coincidence. That's because the big oil companies are recognizing either internally or from pressure from outside investors that they have to shift to clean energy.  We're still a society that's heavily dependent on fossil fuels, but the supply of those fossil fuels, whether from crude oil, from refined products, is dwindling because of this pivot. And so, again, it's not an easy solution. I do think you're right. If we did get Russia and Ukraine to resolve for some reason, there'd be a pullback. But I don't think we're done with the days of a hundred dollars crude and $4 or $5 gasoline and diesel you know, for any time period. (11:22): Well, that's good news for our farmers.  Last question I have for you. Is there anything that you know, could fundamentally alter the inflation picture in the U.S., aside from what the Fed is proposing to do, or is this going to  be something that's kind of hard fought, there's going to be rate increases and it's the situation we're in? (11:48): This is going to have a pullback in investment and all of the investment things that are driven, whether it's real estate, especially home values. But for our farms, I think we're so tied to food, which has an exceptionally highly elastic demand.  That means it doesn't respond much to prices. People have to eat is the main take home message. I think from our farm sector standpoint you know, what would change the paradigm substantially is if energy markets collapsed.  It's hard to see a scenario where that happens. If we go back to the last big energy market downturn of 2007 or 2008, we went from $140 barrel oil quickly down to $40 and $50 barrel oil.  That was really because we saw China on this meteoric rise as a global economy and we needed a throttle price where we could pull back demand.  Until we start to see real signs of demand and pull back, it's hard to see where inflation starts to get tamed. Not saying it won't happen but the numbers I watch and the things I see, we're just not seeing the demand pull back and in the commodity space, I think that's really true.


Jun 23, 2022

by Brad Allen

As you start to think about using fungicide and insecticide applications this year to combat disease and pests, you’ll want to consider the best ways to get the most out of your application. The last thing you want is yield loss.  Let’s look at the 7 things to know before applying insecticides and fungicides:  1. Know your heat Insect development can be tied to growing degree days (GDD). Growing degree days are a measurement of heat accumulation over time.(1) This is helpful in years where days are hotter than previous years and result in an acceleration of insect pressure and more opportunities for pests to affect yield potential by causing damage to roots and foliage. The GDD for 1st generation adult bean leaf beetles are 1,212 degree days.(2) Knowing the degree days can help develop increased awareness and scouting practices as your farm gets closer to these critical GDD. Did you know that you can see growing degree units by uploading your and unlocking this feature on your FBN® account?  2. Scouting for Confidence Increase your confidence in making timely fungicide and insecticide applications with a quality crop scouting program. Typical crop scouting of walking fields every 7 days will help to see patterns of increased pest or disease pressure. Knowing the economic threshold of specific pests can build confidence in when the time is right to make an insecticide application. 3. Curative or Preventive? Fungicides can be segmented into two camps. Curative or Preventive. Preventive activity happens when the fungicide is present in the leaf tissue but before initial infection occurs. Applications with a Group 11 Fungicide such as can help create a protective barrier before plant diseases are present.  A curative fungicide stops the early growth of the fungal pathogen after infection, the first step of the disease cycle, has occurred. Most curative fungicides are also preventive if applied prior to infection. Despite their name, curative fungicides will NOT cure a plant of the disease. They are not effective against advanced disease cycles. A Group 3 fungicide such as   is considered to be a curative fungicide. and can be tank mixed together to provide a one tank mix solution that's both preventive and curative. 4. Inspect what you expect Do you know how much yield potential you saved from yield robbing pests and diseases this year? Uploading your to your account will help you inspect and overlay many features to better understand crop performance. 5. The right time is the best time The performance and benefits of a fungicide application such as and are optimized at ideal times in crop cycle. Soybeans for example would be in the R3 stage to get the most benefit. (3)  Consider adding   to your fungicide application. Insect feeding creates an entry point for fungal diseases to spread, so if you’ve got bugs, hammer them at the same time by adding an insecticide to your tank mix and keep them from spreading into other fields. 6. Optimize your Tank Mix Make the most of your fungicide and insecticide applications by using adjuvants and crop nutrition products. Adjuvants help increase performance of the product through multiple functions. Insecticides need to be applied on contact while the key component of fungicides is to be absorbed into the plant. Farmers First™ adjuvants can help aid in coverage and absorption. Find the right adjuvant pairing to your crop protection products with the   Many growers leverage the fungicide application with the use of which aids in plant uptake.  Learn more about the complete lineup by downloading the . 7. Leverage your plan Growers have many choices today where to purchase their inputs. Knowing ahead of time the products you need gives you flexibility to ensure you are making the best purchasing decision for your operation. has many tools to leverage the network of over 43,000 growers, including transparent list prices. Did you make a purchase from your local retailer? to to unlock pricing transparency and see what the current market price is for the products you are searching. Shop for Crop Protection Products Find the products you need at We have a diverse crop nutrition product portfolio to provide product options for growers like you to support plant health. Sources:


The USDA recently announced an updated livestock disaster aid addressing increased supplemental feed cost in 2021. The ELRP payment will be based on data from the 2021 Livestock Forage Disaster Program (LFP).  CCC-853 (Livestock Forage Disaster Program Application) AD-2047 (Customer Data Worksheet) CCC-902 (Farm Operating Plan for an Individual or Legal Entity) CCC-901 (Member Information for Legal Entities, if applicable) FSA-510 (Request for an Exception to the $125,000 Payment Limitation for Certain Programs, if applicable) CCC-860 (Socially Disadvantaged, Limited Resource, Beginning and Veteran Farmer or Rancher Certification, if applicable) AD-1026 (Highly Erodible Land Conservation (“HELC”) and Wetland Conservation (“WC”) Certification) Phases of the ELRP payments Phase 1 of the payments is expected to total $577 million, basing the payments on percentage of an eligible producers’ gross 2021 LFP payment — 90% for historically underserved producers and 75% for all other producers. And, the payments will be subject to a payment limit. Phase 2: USDA said it was evaluating impacts of 2021 and wildfires on livestock producers as it develops the Phase 2 component.  Phase 1 ELRP eligibility Producer and livestock eligibility for ELRP aligns with the eligibility requirements. Only 2021 LFP participants are eligible for an ELRP payment under Phase 1. Livestock producers must have suffered grazing losses in a county rated by the U.S. Drought Monitor as a D2 (severe drought) for eight consecutive weeks or a D3 (extreme drought) or D4 (exceptional drought) during the normal grazing season of the 2021 calendar year. Livestock producers who were not allowed to graze their permitted federally managed lands due to wildfire are also eligible for ELRP payments.  ELRP payment calculation and limitations When calculating an eligible producer’s Phase One ELRP payment, Farm Service Agency (FSA) will use the producer reported (CCC-853 form) livestock inventories and forage acreage or restricted animal units and grazing days for the 2021 calendar year. Payments will be equal to the eligible livestock producer’s gross 2021 LFP payment multiplied by a payment percentage. For historically underserved producers (i.e., socially disadvantaged, limited resource, beginning, and veteran), the payment percentage is 90%, with a payment percentage of 75% for all other producers. Eligible producers with a CCC-860 on file with FSA for the 2021 program year qualify for the 90% payment percentage. Under ELRP, Adjusted Gross Income (“AGI”) limitations will not apply, however there are payment limitations for eligible producers. The payment limitations will be determined by the producer’s or legal entity’s average adjusted gross farm income, which is income earned from their agricultural operation. If an eligible producer or entity, other than joint ventures or general partnerships, has an average adjusted gross farm income of less than 75% of their average AGI for tax years 2017 through 2019, they cannot receive an ELRP payment of more than $125,000. For an eligible producer or entity, other than joint ventures or general partnership, with an average AGI of at least 75% that is derived from agricultural activities, they may be eligible for an ELRP payment of up to $250,000.  Eligible participants seeking the increased limitation must: File form FSA-510; Provide certification that their average adjusted gross farm income is at least 75% of their AGI; and Provide certification from a licensed Certified Public Accountant or attorney that the participant qualifies to receive the increased limitation. Additional USDA Assistance Opportunities The announcement also included information on a new crop-related disaster effort named . USDA announced a two-phase approach for diversified, row crop and specialty crop operations affected by an eligible disaster event in calendar years 2020 or 2021. USDA also indicated there will be additional relief through the . The ELAP program provides emergency assistance to eligible producers of , and for losses due to disease (including cattle tick fever), adverse weather, or other conditions, such as blizzards and wildfires, not covered by LFP.  The additional ELAP funding will assist producers with the increased cost of hauling livestock to forage. The ELAP compensation is retroactive to 2021 and will also be available for losses in 2022 and subsequent years. The deadline to request all ELAP assistance for 2022 calendar year losses will be Jan. 31, 2023. Important Deadlines The deadline to file for FSA’s LFP program is 30 calendar days after the end of the calendar year the loss occurred (i.e. January 31, 2022 for loss in calendar year 2021).  The deadline to file for FSA’s ELAP program is January 30 following the end of the calendar year in which the loss occurred. Producers must file a notice of loss within 15 days after the loss is apparent for honeybee operations and within 30 days for livestock and farm-raised fish operations. More more information on , please contact your local FSA office. To learn more about the Federal Crop/Livestock Insurance programs contact an insurance agent by visiting the or calling 877-204-4645 .  Source:


Jun 16, 2022

by FBN Network

Today we're excited to announce the start of construction on Farmers Business Network®'s new 198,000 square foot distribution facility in Saskatoon. Once completed in November 2022, the facility will be one of the largest agricultural product distribution facilities in Canada. Supporting logistics operations throughout regional network, the facility will offer local farmers convenient access to faster, even more reliable exactly when they need them. With the launch of our new Saskatoon facility later this year, will have fulfillment centers within 400 kilometers of the vast majority of our more than who represent 20 million acres in Canada. “We are very happy to welcome the Canadian logistics hub to Saskatoon,” says Saskatoon Mayor Charlie Clark. "It strengthens our ability to be a major food production epicenter, helping meet the demands of a growing world. This demonstrates industry confidence in our city and in the expertise and talent we have here.” Serving as the main fulfillment center for in Saskatoon, the new facility at 123 Prospect Rd, Corman Park, SK, will also serve as a hub for smaller logistics networks throughout Saskatchewan and Manitoba. “This excellent location and workforce in Saskatoon are strong assets as we continue the expansion of the modern, reliable logistics network that helps farmers reduce uncertainty and drive profit potential,” says Canada Country Manager Breen Neeser. At , we understand how challenging it can be to get the supplies you need, especially amid shortages at critical times throughout the season. To address this issue, we’ve invested heavily in developing the first modern logistics network in agriculture to use in the creation of an agile system for the efficient movement of critical farm inputs. Our market analysis team harnesses the power of farmer data to directly contribute to farmer profitability. By aggregating and analyzing critical data points including regional weather patterns, national supply trends, direct farmer feedback, and other , logistics network identifies potential shortages and can rapidly redistribute inventory to maintain sufficient supplies. Knowing that our facilities will remain stocked, farmers can expect consistent, convenient deliveries even when widespread supply chain disruptions jeopardize delivery reliability from older systems. “Traditional warehousing of inputs may put farmers at risk – in that the products they need have sold out and won’t be available until a new shipment arrives, damaging their profit potential for the whole season," explains Jack Cox, vice president of global fulfillment and logistics at . "We use data to understand when a potential shortage is emerging so we can address it in real-time with our network of logistics centers, as happened earlier this year when kept key inputs like Glyphosate in stock to serve our members during a shortage this spring.”


Jun 15, 2022

by Heather Stone

Farming is a dangerous profession. It’s a high risk environment for children, young people and adults. While farms are both your workplace and your home, the thought of a child or young person getting injured or worse is unfathomable.  That’s why it’s important to be proactive about safety on the farm. Whether they’re children or young people, it’s important to keep all members of your family safe. But how do you get started?  Here are 9 things to think about to keep your children and family safe on the farm: 1. What supervision protocols are in place? When farming activities are taking place, who’s keeping an eye on the kids to ensure that they’re out of harm’s way? And at what age should supervision change? This will depend on the child and their understanding of the potential dangers of farming. As an adult and parent, your child’s safety is probably already top of mind.    2. Storing chemicals safely Are chemicals easily accessible on your farm? If so, what precautions can you take to ensure dangerous and hazardous chemicals are stored safely from children? An example of storage ideas can range from fire rated hazmat storage (typically for flammable and hazardous chemicals) to chemical storage cabinets. Make sure whatever you use can be locked up and securely stored. There are stringent U.S. for handling certain classes and types of chemicals and pesticides. Additional resources for Canadian and Australian farmers are listed at the bottom of this post. 3. Ride alongs Are ride-alongs ever safe? And at what age should you think about starting to have your child ride along on equipment and tractors? This answer may change depending upon the type, make, model and age of the equipment. Should a tractor with no roll over protection be treated differently than one with it?  Don’t get complacent with a newer tractor.  Does it have enough seatbelts? Can a child fall out of the door if you hit a bump? 4. Farming equipment When should children be given access to farming equipment? What type of training has been provided to the child? Are there other safer activities? If it’s for work on the farm in the U.S. make sure to check and child labor laws for agriculture. 5. Confined spaces What is a confined space and how can children be made aware of their danger? What are the existing  confined spaces on your farm? Some common confined spaces in farming are: grain bins, silos, vats, underground tunnels and wells, water tanks, manure pits, etc.  6. Buildings and structures Are children aware of the dangers of barns and grain elevators? When is it safe for kids to climb buildings and structures? For more information on the exemptions and fall protection regulations for farms in the U.S. review the Occupational Safety and Health Administration presentation . 7. Sources of water Are there ponds, rivers, retention ponds, water tanks, springs, wells, etc. on your farm? Can everyone on the farm swim? If some swimmers are stronger than others, are appropriate safety devices available for those who are not as strong or confident? Discuss water safety with your children and specific examples of when and where they are not allowed to swim on the farm and the importance of having someone else around; i.e. having a buddy system for safety purposes.  8. Farm animals How do you keep kids safe around farm animals? What animals are more dangerous than others? Understand that farm animals are unpredictable and everyone should always be aware of the size and dangers of these animals.  9. Other hazards Other hazards to be aware of on your farm include: Overhead power lines Electricity sources Portable grain augers Moving equipment Power take-off shafts  Uncovered grain dust Keeping your family and kids safe is a personal, regulated, and sensitive topic. Opinions will definitely vary and that’s okay. Depending on where you live, country and state laws may vary. Safety awareness of the dangers of farming is an important step to prevent injuries.  Make it a priority to keep your kids safe by talking to them and having discussions about farm safety.  Additional resources for family farmer safety USA Canada  for kids Australia


Jun 14, 2022

by Brad Roberts

The strength of Farmers Business Network® is the opportunity to share information, insight, and feedback between you and your fellow farmers. Stay Up to Date This Planting Season We are currently polling members to track Canadian progress for cereal, canola, and soy during this year’s planting season. And luckily, you’ll be able to track those results right here on this page. Locking in on the correct data is important for all of us. Week Ending June 14, 2022 Here's this week's planting progress for 206 farms over 0.66 million acres. Week Ending June 2, 2022 Here's this week's planting progress for 223 farms over 0.76 million acres. Week Ending May 26, 2022 Here's this week's planting progress for 533 farms over 2.59 million acres. Week Ending May 16, 2022 Here's this week's planting progress for 521 farms over 2.34 million acres.


Jun 14, 2022

by Jeff Vanrobaeys

Peas are a great nitrogen fixing crop option that can improve soil health. Growing peas allows a grower to introduce different herbicide groups into their herbicide rotation plan.  FBN® is well positioned to support your field pea crop in western Canada.  Let’s look at four ways to get to get the most out of your field pea crop this year: 1. Planting Rather than relying on using refined nitrogen in peas, inoculants are a great tool  to promote nodulation and as a result nitrogen fixation. Inoculants can be applied as a liquid or peat product directly on seed or alternatively granular inoculants can be applied in furrow during planting. offers several Liquid and Granular Inoculants to fit most needs, maximizing inoculation, and ensuring N fixation. Rolling peas after planting helps bury rocks and provides a uniform seedbed aiding with plant establishment and helps prepare the field for harvest. 2. Weed Control Season-long weed control in peas can be challenging, so using a residual product can help improve extend efficacy. combines two effective modes of action: Imazamox (group 2) and Bentazon (Group 6) and provides contact as well as residual control on many weeds in Field Peas. Benz offers  broadleaf and grass weed control in Field peas and has equivalent or higher efficiency comparable to other commercial products. Benz provides great control of Volunteer Canola (all types) and All (even herbicide resistant) Wild Mustard, as well as control of Cleavers and Kochia and suppression of Wild Buckwheat For best grassy weed control in peas, applying a tank mix of  with Benz is recommended.  Available in 2 x 8.1L Cases or 129.6 L Drums, and can be purchased with Pro Ag UAN 28-0-0 from to complete the package. 3. Micronutrient Support Augmenting fertility if required, and providing micronutrients that help support  plant health and  alleviate post herbicide application stress, helps plants quickly recover from herbicide application. B Sure is a proven biostimulant that helps the pea plant in abiotic conditions. From moisture stress to hail, frost or herbicide application, B Sure is a very effective product to support plant productivity. 4. Fungicide  There are multiple tools available to help manage and mitigate anticipated disease pressure in peas.  offers effective pulse fungicides that control the most damaging diseases in peas, while maximizing a growers ROI potential.  , , are key strobiluron’s to control key pulse diseases such as Aschocyta and Anthracnose.  Shop now Check out to learn more about our full range of crop protection products.