Author

FBN Network


Mar 14, 2023

by FBN Network

All you need is your yield monitor files, your soil samples, and your state's crop nutrient removal figures to carefully manage both your crop yields and your input budgets. Here's how. Yield monitors have dramatically increased our ability to improve nutrient management on each and every field. Historically, nutrient recommendations were based on yield goals chosen by farmers, which often meant that they were based on a farmer’s aspirational yield, rather than the actual needs and reasonable expectations of a field’s yield potential. In some cases, this led to massive over-applications of fertilizers which, beyond costing farmers a lot of money, has also had negative impacts on water systems across the country. Getting the right nutrients , in the right amount, to the right part of the field is the key cost-effective nutrient management, and one powerful tool in identifying those factors is your yield files. Yield monitor data allows farmers to accurately replace the nutrients that have been removed from the soil by the previous crops by showing them exactly where nutrients were removed. Top yielding areas within a field remove more nutrients, so it’s generally safe to assume that in a field with big variations in yields, you’ll need to change your application rate within the field to make sure you get the nutrients to where they’ve been removed. If farmers aren’t careful to replenish these nutrients, field fertility will decline, decreasing the yield potential in the field every year.   Organizing Yield Monitor Data Organizing your yield monitor data into zones can be a valuable way to determine the amount of nutrients that are removed from an area in a cropping year. These zones can be defined in multiple ways; by soil types, grids, aerial imagery, historic yield data, etc. The smaller your chosen zones are, the more accurately you’ll be able to apply replacement nutrients, within the limitations of equipment and time. [READ: 8 Ways to Track Your Farm Data Throughout the Season] Soil Tests If soil test data is available for the field and can be summarized for each zone, the rates can be adjusted so that excess applications will not waste the input and zones with low soil test values can have higher rates applied to increase yield potential and fertilizer efficiency. More antiquated methods of determining applications, like the whole field yield goals previously discussed, tend to average out applications across fields. You'll often end up applying less than what is needed in high-yielding areas, possibly crippling your yield potential for the coming seasons, while over-applying and wasting fertilizer in low-yielding areas.   [READ: How to Read a Soil Analysis Test] Crop Nutrient Removal Numbers Crop nutrient removal numbers vary between states, and more information on crop nutrient removal numbers can be found at state agricultural extension service pages online. The USDA also has compiled a list of removal rates and has created tools to access the information ( https://plants.usda.gov/npk/main ).   Using these defined removal factors, each zone in your field can be treated as an independent field and have its own recommendation calculated so that you can have more confidence that you’re getting nutrients exactly where they’re needed most. The best way to check your nutrient application strategy on any zone in the field is to soil sample on a regular basis (most recommendations suggest a four year soil test rotation for all fields) and keep records of all inputs between sampling cycles. By using precision application methods to apply nutrients, you can use your crop nutrient removal numbers, your application totals, and your soil sample information to determine if your application strategy is really helping you replenish your soil’s nutrients, and ensure your soil reaches and maintains its peak fertility. Looking For Crop Nutrition Products? If you're purchasing  soil prebiotics ,  soil probiotics ,  high uptake nutrients  or other  crop nutrition products  to improve your soil, FBN Direct®  offers a range of solutions available for delivery directly to your farm. Shop online 24/7 with full insight into pricing and discounts upfront — no rebates required.  Copyright © 2014 - 2023 Farmer's Business Network, Inc. All rights Reserved. The sprout logo, “Farmers Business Network”, “FBN”, “FBN Direct” are trademarks, registered trademarks or service marks of Farmer's Business Network, Inc. FBN Direct products and services and other products distributed by FBN Direct are offered by FBN Inputs, LLC and are available only in states where FBN Inputs, LLC is licensed and where those products are registered for sale or use, if applicable. If applicable, please check with your local extension service to ensure registration status. Nothing contained on this page, including the prices listed should be construed as an offer for sale, or a sale of products. All products and prices are subject to change at any time and without notice. Terms and conditions apply. ALWAYS READ AND FOLLOW LABEL DIRECTIONS. It is a violation of federal and state law to use any pesticide product other than in accordance with its label. The distribution, sale and use of an unregistered pesticide is a violation of federal and/or state law and is strictly prohibited. We do not guarantee the accuracy of any information provided on this page or which is provided by us in any form. It is your responsibility to confirm prior to purchase and use that a product is labeled for your specific purposes, including, but not limited to, your target crop or pest and its compatibility with other products in a tank mix and that the usage of a product is otherwise consistent with federal, state and local laws. We reserve the right to restrict sales on a geographic basis in our sole discretion. You must have a valid applicator license to use restricted use pesticides. Please consult your state department of agriculture for complete rules and regulations on the use of restricted use pesticides, as some products require specific record-keeping requirements. All product recommendations and other information provided is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for consulting the product label or for specific agronomic, business, or professional advice. Where specific advice is necessary or appropriate, consult with a qualified advisor. Neither Farmer's Business Network Inc. nor any of its affiliates makes any representations or warranties, express or implied, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in the material and any liability therefore is expressly disclaimed.


Mar 09, 2023

by FBN Network

These pre-season tasks will help you and your operators make the most of your precision equipment. When you back your planter into the shop to do pre-planting checks, you should do the same with your planting monitor. While you’re drawing up your planting schedule and prepping your team, here are a few steps to make it a great season:  1. Determine your farm's optimal planting conditions and timing.   By analyzing past yields, FBN can help you identify your farm’s historically optimal planting temperature. In FBN Seed Finder, you can check daily soil temperatures and see seed response to planting temperature and date.  2. Find your optimal planting speed and seeding rate with the Analyze My Operation tool. FBN analyzes your farm’s data to find multi-year trends across your operation in order to effectively determine your planter’s most yield-efficient speed and highest yielding seeding rate. Planting too quickly can cost you real yield dollars, so make sure all your team members know your farm’s unique speed limit! 3. Determine your prescription accuracy to see how well you’ve executed your planting prescriptions in the past. Factors like excessive planting speed, complex prescriptions, high seeding rates and difficult terrain can affect the accuracy of your prescriptions. FBN analyzes planter data to identify your equipment’s effective performance range, both on the field level and across your whole operation.  4. Know whether your prescriptions have been properly inputted and tested. All manufacturers have their own best practices on how prescriptions need to be written, so meet with your Precision Ag Specialist for specific use information and tips for your software. You should have your prescriptions written and inputted to your monitors as early as possible. Your specialist should have insight on what challenges exist and can even contact your prescription provider to write prescriptions for your operation. 5. Identify and understand software updates for your monitor or GPS. Even when software updates are available (for example, Precision Planting requires yearly updates to access the most current database of varieties) your technician may recommend another, more reliable version for your specific area or needs. Open houses or clinics are a great resource to make sure that your displays are up-to-date and properly calibrated.  Once you’ve nailed down all the pre-planting information you need, check out the 5 Steps to Optimize Planting Data Collection for tips on calibrating your precision equipment for optimal data collection. Copyright © 2014 - 2023 Farmer's Business Network, Inc. All rights Reserved. The sprout logo, “Farmers Business Network”, “FBN” are trademarks, registered trademarks or service marks of Farmer's Business Network, Inc. ALWAYS READ AND FOLLOW LABEL DIRECTIONS. It is a violation of federal and state/provincial law to use any crop protection product other than in accordance with its label. The distribution, sale and use of an unregistered pesticide is a violation of federal and/or state law and is strictly prohibited. It is your responsibility to confirm prior to purchase and use that a product is labeled for your specific purposes, including, but not limited to, your target crop or pest and its compatibility with other products in a tank mix.


Mar 07, 2023

by FBN Network

It’s time to start thinking about planning your farm’s budget. Proper planning ahead of time will help you make major decisions for your operation.  Join FBN ®’s Sunday Mancini as she sits down with TJ Wilson to talk about farm planning and budgeting. TJ Wilson is the Director of Sales for FBN ® Finance. He comes to FBN from a 15 year career in the banking industry working in lending and management roles after graduating from Kansas State University. In addition to working in FBN Finance, TJ is also part of a corn and soybean operation with his family in Northeast Kansas. Farm Planning and Budgeting Webinar Agenda Getting started ( 00:00 ) Projecting your income ( 03:03 ) Projecting your expenses ( 07:17 ) Prepping your balance sheet ( 12:23 ) Financial ratios explained ( 17:35 ) Watch Now: Building a Farm Budget Farm Budget Benchmarking Tools As TJ mentions, there are a number of tools that are produced annually by different universities across the country. A few good benchmarking tools include those below: Kansas State University - https://www.agmanager.info/sites/default/files/pdf/Farm%20Financial%20Benchmarking.pdf University of Illinois - https://farmdocdaily.illinois.edu/2018/09/what-should-my-farm-benchmark University of Minnesota - https://www.cffm.umn.edu/initiatives/benchmarking/ [WATCH: Webinar: Refinancing Your Land Loan: Maximize Savings & Opportunities] Loans from FBN® Finance Applying for a loan can sometimes feel like a daunting process, but the loan advisor team at  FBN  Finance is here to help. With an average of 15+ years each in Ag finance experience,  FBN  loan advisors are available to talk you through all facets of the real estate loan process, discuss any questions or concerns you may have and make sure you get the solution that best fits the unique needs of your Ag operation.  Click here , complete the brief form below, or call 866-619-3080 to get started. Audio Transcript Sunday Mancini: Hey everyone, this is Sunday with Farmers Business Network® and we're here today to talk about all things budgeting and financing as we look toward 2022. And TJ Wilson is our expert who will be guiding us through this journey. He is the head of sales for FBN® Finance. So, hello TJ. Let's dive right into it. TJ Wilson: Thanks for having me. Sunday Mancini: Let's get started with the biggest question that maybe everyone has. Why do I need a farm budget? TJ Wilson: I think budgets are important for all farmers as they're looking because the crop year is obviously year to year, so we need to think about what's the next year gonna look like what kind of income are they gonna generate off of that crop or their expenses gonna be, and start building a baseline for what that may look like and help them make some decisions for the next year. Sunday Mancini: Awesome. So going into this budgeting process what information do farmers need to create or update their current farm budget? TJ Wilson: Yeah. The best information to use when creating a farm budget is looking at your historical information. Obviously farmers all have tax returns, you know, look back at what your expenses have been historically, try to build a baseline for what that may look like for the next year. By this time of year, a lot of farmers are already starting to lock in their expenses as well, so they're gonna have a good idea of what their crop is gonna cost them to raise over the next year, and they're gonna know what they're gonna plant what their formal planting attentions are gonna be because they, a lot of them have already bought their seed, so they're gonna have a good idea of what their expenses are. And then when it comes to the expense or the income side of things, just narrowing down, you know, being conservative with what you're looking at, you know, what are you gonna raise? How much are you gonna raise? What are conservative price estimates gonna be? So looking at those types of things, or that's the main information that you're gonna need in building your budget for the next year. Sunday Mancini: Gotcha. And so if they go about sort of creating a plan and they're thinking about it conservatively, how do they set goals for a crop year? TJ Wilson: Yeah, I think it really comes down to each individual operation has different goals. So what is your goal for the year? Is it paying off debt? Is it building working capital? Is it making as much money as you possibly can? Is it taking risk off the table? So you know, based off of what your goal is for your operation sitting down and com, coming up with a budget that will build around those goals and help accomplish that. So looking at it from the standpoint of, you know, knowing what your revenue that you want, what your income is that you want to accomplish, what your goal is, build a conservative estimate both from the income and expense side of things to try to build in those types of baselines for yourself. You know, a lot of operations, you wanna make sure that you're conservative in what your expense approach is gonna be to make sure that you've built in enough cushion to, you know, handle the unforeseen situations that we've seen over the last few years. There's a lot of volatility in the ag space, especially on the income side right now. So building in a good cushion for yourself and building in a lot of leeway for your operation to be successful is the utmost importance. Sunday Mancini: Gotcha. Awesome. So let's take a minute to sort of look at projecting income for farmers. So as they look toward 2022, what are the some of the key components of projected income? TJ Wilson: Yeah, the, the key components they're gonna look at is basically the crop insurance information. So most operations have an average yield or an APH that they look at for crop insurance purposes. You know, when you're building a projected cash flow, use that APH information as your average yield. So I would set that as your baseline your under your straightforward main budget plan. And then on the pricing side of things, you know, use conservative estimate there. Obviously we have crop insurance prices that are set in March. But use the December planning prices or whatever those planning prices is are for the crop that you're gonna grow and build in a little bit of cushion off of that, discount it a little bit to make sure that you have some cushion for that volatility that's in the market and use that yield in that price estimate to build in those types of scenarios. TJ Wilson: Obviously government payments is another key item that a lot of farmers are have kind of grown used to over the last few years. Typically, when I'm helping prepare a crop budget, I do not utilize government payments whatsoever. You can't count on 'em, you never know what they're gonna do year to year. So build that budget off of what your actual crop intentions are gonna be in what you expect to grow that year. So those are pretty important when building that. And then on the flip side of that, I typically build one or two other budgets as well on the income side of things. You know, build a revenue plan based off of, you know, what you actually expect to grow from a yield standpoint with some good prices and then go the other direction, you know, what does a crop insurance price look like for yourself this year? You know, if you have a disaster crop and you have to live off a crop insurance, how does that affect your budget overall so that you know, both ends of the spectrum or what you're gonna deal with. Sunday Mancini: Yeah. Awesome. So looking at those benchmarks how can farmers use benchmarks to evaluate their projected income? TJ Wilson: Yeah, obviously this is the, the budget is a tool year to year. And it's not a one and done thing at the beginning of the year when you're making your budget plan. So most farmers should adjust that budget throughout the year and use it as a tool to help guide their decisions all year long. Mainly their marketing decisions, that's an important item for them or their other purchasing decisions if they have the ability to prepay, you know, how does that look like compared to last year, you know, what were those prices last year? How did that fit into their budget and how to affect their budget overall from a breakeven standpoint on their crop? So utilizing that all year long. And then looking at it from year to year, you know, when you did your budget last year and versus this year, what were those comparisons? You know, what was your breakeven difference? Where did you spend more last year than you plan to spend this year? So using that historical information going forward is just gonna help you be a sharper operation. Sunday Mancini: Awesome. so as far as, this is sort of a fun question to, to wrap up this segment, but what steps can I take and what steps can farmers take to improve their 2022 income? TJ Wilson: You know, farmers are doing everything they can right now to try to, you know, limit as much risk as they possibly can. Right now, that's the biggest challenge is the volatility in the risk in the market. So a lot of farmers are trying to do what they can to limit the downside. So what they can do right now is continue to use any risk management tools they have available to 'em. You know, obviously crop insurance whether that's multi peril revenue protection or whole farm insurance are two options that at least limit the downside for operations. Also, working with a team of advisors, you know, whether that's your agronomic advisors, your crop insurance agent, your lender or banker, any financial advisors that you utilize in addition to your marketing advisor. So it takes a team to run a farming operation right now. TJ Wilson: And especially in the volatile times that we're in right now, it takes all hands-on deck and a lot of intelligence farmers have enough on their plate to have to deal with every day and managing their operation. That bringing in some experts will definitely help limit the downside of that operation. And looking at where you're at day-to-day with the ups and downs in the market and the ups and downs of the expense side of things with all the inputs, you know, reevaluate once a month you know, see where your operation is, see where your marketing plan is, see how your budget has adjusted based off of what's going on in the market today. Sunday Mancini: All right. So as we sort of look at projecting expenses for farmers as they approach the next year what are some of the key components of projected expenses? TJ Wilson: Yeah, on the expense side of things, that's a little bit, you know, where we're at right now, that's the hot topic. So expenses continue to rise across the board. I know we did a supply chain video here last week, I believe that talked a little bit about the supply chain and what's, what's causing some of the increase in the expenses and when that may end. It doesn't sound like that's in sight anytime soon. So when you're looking at the expense side of things, you know, two, I always say, or one, I always say, guess high. You know, if you're gonna make an estimate, always, you know, build in plenty of cushion when you're looking at that. Make sure that you handle your, your key components to your operation. You know, the seed, chemical fertilizer, those main inputs that you have to go out and buy every year, and you have to deal with on an annual basis. TJ Wilson: So make sure that you lock those down. As far as knowing where those prices are obviously rent is another big component there if you have to rent ground knowing what your land costs are. So when you're looking at that by this time of year, a lot of people have their prices locked in or have a very good idea of what they are. So use those actual expenses and use a little bit of cushion for overage that you may have if you don't have it on already. Or you have to make any in-season decisions to, you know, add some fertilizer to those crops and try to increase that yield. So looking at those types of things, make sure you're building a little bit of cushion there. Also look at, you know, starting with what you have last year, you know, what did you spend on chemical? TJ Wilson: What's that gonna look like compared to this year? You know, what did you exp spend on repairs last year? Fuel everything across the board. As I mentioned earlier, you have the tax returns. Use those as tools when you're building your budgets going forward. Both on the income and expense side of things. So the other thing that a lot of farmers don't take into account while they're looking at their budgets and don't build into their cashflow budgets going forward is their equipment costs their equipment costs and their overhead. You know, you want to get paid for your work. You know, the farmers wanna make sure that they make a return for their time and their effort. Make sure you build in enough cushion so that you get a return to management for your operation or return to land that you own already. You wanna make sure you're generating a return for that and figuring your depreciation costs. Obviously you're figuring in fuel and repairs, but are you figuring in what the cost is to replace those pieces of equipment? They're not gonna last forever. So make sure you're building in some cushion there and building in plenty of wiggle room for yourself and your operation to be able to expand and make the decisions unique going forward. Sunday Mancini: What benchmarks should farmers use to evaluate their projected expenses? TJ Wilson: Yeah, there's a number of tools out there. So there's a few universities that have reports that come out annually that kind of talk about what the expenses are in the market for different parts of the operation. And then when you come looking at a number of other things, use yourself as a benchmark, you know, what have you done historically? You know, what are, what have your operating expenses look like year over year? How do those compare to this year? And then utilize the, the team advisors that we talked about earlier. You know, how does that compare? Talk to your lender, talk to your banker, talk to your seed rep, your agronomic advisors, you know, whoever you're working with, and figure out what the norm is. You know, am I paying too much for this type of stuff? You know, what's normal in the market? What's it been historically? Do I need to adjust my rates? You know, things like that that you want to take into account to make sure that you're meeting the budget criteria that you set for, and that you, you can accomplish the goals that you wanna reach for. Sunday Mancini: Awesome. And so, you know, this is a question I think that everyone can relate to. What steps can farmers take to reduce their 2022 expenses? TJ Wilson: Yeah, obviously that's a, a big challenge this year with the increase in prices that we're gonna look at, but this is more of a long-term topic as well. So what can you do year over year to be able to reduce some expenses? When you're looking at building these things, obviously there's always a lot of fat in anybody's budget that they wanna make sure they build in. So build a budget that works build a budget that make sure it has enough cushion and it still works, you know, if, if you're guessing your expense is high. And then figure out throughout the year are there things that you can make adjustments on. Obviously, you know, the agronomic advisors out there they're gonna have a lot of information on whether that's variable rate applications variable fertilizer, variable rate seating, things like that, that will reduce costs overall. TJ Wilson: So those are definitely things that we need to be considering. Things that you need to be talking to your advisor team about to build in ways to reduce your costs reviewing your, your rental agreements if you have them out there taking a look at those, are there things that can be adjusted so that they're fair to both you and the landlord? If you rent ground and just looking at little pieces of your operation, obviously repairs parts, everything goes into that operation, everything goes into that budget to be able to cut back certain expenses. It's not gonna be one major expense item that somebody can cross off their list when it comes to the, the agriculture operations. It's a lot of little things that you have to make adjustments on. Sunday Mancini: Yeah. Awesome. so another component for budgeting is the balance sheet. So can you give us an overview of that? What is a balance sheet for farmers? TJ Wilson: Yeah, obviously, you know, the cash flow is, is one part of your operation. When you're looking at that, you know, that's what you're looking at from year to year. You know, am I gonna make money or am I gonna lose money on this next year's crop? And, and how am I gonna do that? When you're looking at a balance sheet, that's a look at a single point in time where you're looking at your overall financial health of your operation. So the balance sheet is gonna be a collection of all of your assets and all of your liabilities, everything you own and everything that you owe. So when you're doing that, you're gonna build it in three different scenarios. So you're gonna have what we call the current section of that balance sheet, which is assets and liabilities that are gonna be, you will either liquidate or that you will have to pay within the next 12 months. TJ Wilson: The next section of that balance sheet is gonna be the intermediate section, and that's gonna be the same thing, assets and liabilities, but that's gonna be more anything from 12 months up to around seven years. Depending on the type of operation it's gonna be assets that have about a useful life, life of seven years. A lot of that's your cattle and equipment. The type of things that sit in that section of the balance sheet and vice versa. On the liability side, it's gonna be, you know, debts that have to be paid over that time period. A lot of it's term cattle loans, equipment loans sometimes pivots and things along those lines. Vehicle loans that you're gonna be paying on. The bottom section of the balance sheet is what we call the long term section. It's gonna be long term assets and liabilities. TJ Wilson: This is mainly just real estate. So you know, we have a real estate, we have any other long-term assets that we own, whether that's investments or, you know, retirement accounts or things like that that farmers have versus mainly just real estate debt. So that's gonna sit on that long-term section of that balance sheet. You know, on the current section back to that, you know, that's gonna be really your inventory, your cash so things that you're gonna be liquidating in the next year, whether that's prepaids or accounts payable on the liability side. So anything that you owe your vendors that you have to pay in the short term. Sunday Mancini: Awesome. And as sort of they, the farmer may itemize the different things that they'll need to include in the battle sheet, what should they include? TJ Wilson: Yeah, absolutely. So be as thorough as you possibly can. So obviously we want to include everything. It's a true picture of your overall financial health and it is a tool that we can look at year over year. I would highly recommend when you're preparing these balance sheets, try to do it the same time every year. I know a lot of operations when I'm working with my customers, I try to sit down and do it January 1st. I encourage them, you know, if they sit down, they're watching football games on New Year's Day you know, try to look at your balance sheet a little bit and sit down and do that while you're watching football. Now that way you have it timestamped and it's the same point in time every year and it's gonna be a good tool for you to be able to measure your success year over year. TJ Wilson: So when you're looking at what to include, include everything you possibly can you know, be realistic about what you're including though you know, make sure you have accurate inventory numbers, make sure you have fairly accurate debt numbers. You know, try to include, you know, what do you owe who do you owe it to what are the interest rates? It's just a good review for every operation on an annual basis to sit down and look at, Hey, make sure I have my bearings about me. I know what kind of assets I have, I know who I owe what to when it's due and how much is due because you're gonna use a lot of the components out of that to help build your budget for the next year as well. So obviously when you're including your budget, you're gonna include what your debt payments are and any expenses that you have due over the next 12 months so that you can make sure you have an accurate representation of what that operation looks like. Sunday Mancini: Why is it important? What value do farmers see from it? TJ Wilson: Yeah, absolutely. So I mean, farmers, you know, are, are tricky individuals when it comes to, you know, the way you're looking at their overall financial health. So farmers are a lot different than other businesses. Other businesses operate on, you know, the shorter sections of their balance sheet where it comes intermediate liabilities, they have a lot of machinery, they have a lot of cash and inventory. Farmers cash and inventory does, it's out there. They use a lot of it because obviously they grow a big crop. But farmers balance sheet typically lies towards the bottom side. A lot of 'em have a lot of long-term assets. Farmers are always, you know, real estate rich cash poor. So, and that's the common saying out there. So their savings account is their real estate, and so making sure that you've got enough equity in your balance sheet should you need to tap into that ever is a good tool to measure on an annual basis and especially with the volatility that we're seeing right now. TJ Wilson: So are there things in, in your balance sheet that you need to be thinking about and planning for? Just like we talked about with your goals earlier on? You know, what do you want to get your balance sheet to the point of what are your goals long term? Do you want to hand real estate down to your kids? Do you wanna build a operation for the next generation? Do you wanna retire the next five years? What does that look like? And so looking at your balance sheet is a good gauge and tool to tell you whether you'll be able to accomplish some of those things going forward. Sunday Mancini: Awesome. That's great. And I feel like helpful even for me. Maybe I need to start budgeting myself. Awesome. So I wanna talk through some terminology that I certainly would love to learn more about. And that is financial ratios. So I'll go through some of those terms and, and hopefully learn something myself. Starting with a current ratio. What is it, what is its implications? TJ Wilson: Yeah, we talked about the current section of your balance sheet a little bit bit ago. So that's gonna be that top section of, you know, the, the inventory and liabilities that are all due within one year or can be liquidated in one year. So what does that ratio mean? What does it look like? So basically it's just your current assets over your current liabilities. So do you have more current assets than you have current liabilities? That's the key component right there. So we call that the working capital position and the current ratio. So typically we wanna see a current ratio, obviously over one. We wanna make sure that you have more current assets than you have current liabilities so that you have enough inventory, cash or anything on hand to be able to pay all your debts that are due within the next year. TJ Wilson: So obviously with the, the farmers, they have an annual crop, so they're gonna be generating cashflow all the time when it comes to that thing. But is there any point in time where they do not have enough on hand to be able to pay what they owe the next year? So that's something that a lot of lenders and a lot of bankers sit down and look at. That's a key component when they're doing their analysis. So obviously the higher the number, the better. You know, the general guideline is, you know, about 1.25 to one. So we want to make sure that you have, you know, at least 25% more assets on hand than you have of any liabilities due in the next year. So this is, you know, major cushion. It allows a lot of operations to do things they need to do on an annual basis with the, what we've seen in the the volatility of the input prices this last year, being able to react quickly when you get the opportunity to buy something that you feel is a fair price or that you've been offered to make sure that you can take having that cash on hand or having a good working capital position allows you to do those things. TJ Wilson: So farmers need to definitely take a look each year what is their working capital position. That's a key component they wanna look at when they're doing their balance sheet and doing their cash flow on an annual basis. So if you do have times like we see right now where you have high input expenses and you might see a negative cash flow over the next year, that's not the worst thing in the world as long as you have enough working capital to survive. You know, farmers have been through tough times, they've been through tight times. Do they have enough equity on their balance sheet and enough working capital on hand to be able to to stomach a tough year. Sunday Mancini: Gotcha. so what is a debt to asset ratio? TJ Wilson: Yeah, the debt to asset ratio is very similar to the current ratio, but it takes the entire balance sheet into account. So how many assets do you have versus how many liabilities do you have? So looking at do you have more assets than you have liabilities? Most farmers do, obviously they have a lot of, you know, high dollar assets with the real estate and the equipment that they have on hand. So what does this balance or this ratio really tell us? It tells us what the viability of that operation is long term. So if you have plenty of equity in your balance sheet you can stomach a tough year or two, you know, you have the ability to work through any tough times that come ahead. And it means that you're basically building your retirement account. So the more equity that you have in that operation the more flexibility it gives to your operation the more viability it gives to it long term and gives you a lot of options to do what you want to do, do, whether that's, you know, accomplish your goals, buy real estate, look at a number of different things that you're trying to do going forward. TJ Wilson: And it really tells a picture of the financial health of the operation. Sunday Mancini Awesome. Well I really appreciate you going through and answering all these questions for us. This has been super helpful and informative. But where can farmers learn more about financing through FBN? TJ Wilson Yeah, absolutely. So I mean, we have our website, fbn.com slash finance, so that's where they can go to our finance page, learn about the other products and services that we have available. And we have a team of lenders standing by ready to talk to any farmer or operator that wants to, to go through some of these scenarios. We've got a very skilled team very experienced to be able to talk through a number of these scenarios and work through balance sheets and budgeting questions that these farmers have on an annual basis. Sunday Mancini Awesome. Well thank you so much TJ, and this was great. TJ Wilson Thanks Sunday. Copyright © 2014 - 2023 Farmer's Business Network, Inc. All rights Reserved. The sprout logo, and “FBN” are trademarks, registered trademarks or service marks of Farmer's Business Network, Inc.  Terms and conditions apply. Land financing offered by FBN Finance, LLC, provided in connection with Farmer Mac and our underwriting partners, and is available only where FBN Finance, LLC is licensed. To qualify, a borrower must be a member of Farmer’s Business Network, Inc., and meet the underwriting requirements of FBN Finance, LLC and its lending partners. All credit is subject to approval and underwriting. Interest rates and fees will vary depending on your individual situation. Not all applicants will qualify


Mar 02, 2023

by FBN Network

Are you ready for planting? Follow these three helpful steps to get high quality data this season. 1. Name your farms and fields consistently between your monitor and your FBN® account. Tip: To make sure everyone on your team uses the same names for consistency across all operators, list out your field names and make sure the list is visible in the cab for everyone to reference. 2. As you start planting on each field, double check to ensure you’ve entered the full seed name with traits into your monitor and that you are successfully recording seeding rate and speed. Tip : Enter your seed data prior to planting to help FBN better match seeds in your account for analysis later in the season. 3. After planting, transmit planting data to your FBN account by exporting raw data from the monitor and easily uploading it to your account.  Tip : For more information on importing data, check out FBN FAQs .  Copyright © 2014 - 2023 Farmer's Business Network, Inc. All rights Reserved. The sprout logo, “Farmers Business Network”, “FBN” are trademarks, registered trademarks or service marks of Farmer's Business Network, Inc.


Mar 01, 2023

by FBN Network

Paired with FBN's leading data technology, the 198,000 square-foot facility helps farmers sidestep supply chain snarls and access critical inputs faster than ever SAN CARLOS, Calif., & HIGH RIVER, Alberta – March 1, 2023 -- Farmers Business Network (FBN®), the global AgTech platform and farmer-to-farmer network, announced today that its Saskatoon fulfillment centre has opened and started processing orders for growers across Saskatchewan and Canada. The 198,000 square foot facility opens just in time for planting and key deliveries of essential crop protection, biological nutrients, and seed inputs. The facility enables FBN to further its industry leading logistics network, getting closer to customers for faster delivery and increased reliability. "We're excited to better serve our Canadian members through this cutting edge facility, helping growers get what they need, when they need it," said Breen Neeser, FBN ’s Country Manager for Canada. "Our Saskatoon facility is the primary hub in our Western Canada logistics network and among our largest in North America, empowering timely, reliable and transparent deliveries that farmers can depend on." Located at 123 Prospect Rd, Corman Park, SK, the facility serves as the Primary Fulfillment Centre for FBN in Saskatoon and supports 7 satellite logistics nodes throughout the network in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba.  With the opening of this facility, FBN now has fulfillment centers within 400 kilometers of the vast majority of its Canadian members. “We are very happy to welcome the Farmers Business Network Canadian logistics hub to Saskatoon," said Saskatoon Mayor Charlie Clark. "It strengthens our ability to be a major food production epicentre, helping meet the demands of a growing world. This demonstrates industry confidence in our city and in the expertise and talent we have here.” FBN 's leading logistic network combines with its leading data insights to understand and proactively address potential supply shortages – which is vital in today's uncertain markets. By aggregating and analyzing critical data points including regional weather patterns, national supply trends, direct farmer feedback, and other key market insights, FBN ’s logistics network identifies potential shortages and can rapidly redistribute inventory to maintain sufficient supplies. Combining this powerful data with an increasingly widespread logistics network will help members effectively navigate every season. "We're proud to further our industry leading logistics network through opening our Saskatoon facility, which will ensure all Canadian farmers have timely access to the  equipment and inputs they need, regardless of wider market trends," said Jack Cox, VP of Global Fulfillment and Logistics, FBN . The facility officially began processing orders in late November and will serve FBN 's 8,000 Canadian members and counting.  About FBN : Farmers Business Network® (FBN®) is an independent AgTech platform and farmer-to-farmer network with a mission to power the prosperity of family farmers around the world while working towards a sustainable future. Its Farmers First® promise has attracted over 55,000 members to the network with a common goal of helping farmers maximize their farm’s profit potential with data and technology enabled direct-to farmer commerce, community and sustainability offerings. FBN has set out to redefine value and convenience for farmers by helping reduce the cost of production and maximize the value of their crops. The FBN network has grown to cover more than 117 million acres of member farms in the US and Canada. Blending the best of Midwestern agricultural roots and Silicon Valley technology, the company has principal offices in San Carlos, CA, Chicago, IL, Sioux Falls, SD and a Canadian Headquarters in High River, Alberta with significant warehouse and logistics, remote and field employees across the U.S. and Canada. To learn more, visit: www.fbn.com . Contact Keith Chapman media@farmersbusinessnetwork.com  Copyright © 2015 - 2023 Farmer's Business Network Canada, Inc. All rights reserved. The sprout logo, "Farmers Business Network," "FBN,", "Farmers First", "FBN Direct," "F2F Genetics Network", "Pro Ag", and "Professional Ag Distributors" are trademarks, registered trademarks or service marks of Farmer's Business Network, Inc. or its affiliates.


Feb 28, 2023

by FBN Network

Signal words are found on all pesticide product labels. These words describe human acute toxicity of the formulated pesticide product in the container. The four signal levels used are: Danger - Poison Danger Warning Caution Each has a clearly defined meaning. How Signal Labels Are Chosen While you should be careful around all pesticide products and follow all safety instructions no matter what signal word is indicated, it is still important to know the difference between the varying levels of signal words. 1. Danger ☠ Poison These pesticide products are highly toxic by at least one exposure entry into the body. 2. Danger Products labeled with danger but without the accompanying skull and crossbones and Poison label can still cause serious eye damage or skin irritation. 3. Warning This means the pesticide product is moderately toxic when eaten, inhaled, absorbed through skin or moderate skin and eye irritation. 4. Caution Indicates the pesticide product is slightly toxic if inhaled, absorbed through the skin, or eaten and causes minor eye irritation. What are Signal Words on Labels? Signal words are useful for pesticide users to be aware of hazards associated with the pesticide of choice. Signal words can be used to select pesticide of lesser toxicity that can effectively control target pests. It is important to recognize that all pesticides have the potential to be toxic to humans when used in high doses. Always read and follow label directions before applying any pesticide. The label also tells what PPE (personal protective equipment) is required when handling the pesticide. [READ: 7 Things US Farmers Should Know about Insecticide and Fungicide Applications this Year] Additional information available on a label While it’s important to understand signal words, there is also additional information on a pesticide label that can help you understand hazards of the pesticide and how to avoid them. You’ll see a section on hazards to humans and domestic animals, environmental hazards, and physical and chemical hazards, such as propensity for fire or explosions. You’ll also receive information on first aid treatment if someone does get poisoned by a pesticide. You should ALWAYS call the National Poison Center Hotline — keep the number 1-800-222-1222 posted and have the label on hand and ready to reference. [READ: How to Read a Chemical Label] Find the inputs you need using FBN Direct® You can double down on savings and convenience when you shop for ag chemicals on FBN Direct . FBN Direct has the products you need to run your operation smoothly this season like Willowood Glypho 6 , Willowood Clethodim 2EC and 2,4-D LV6 Value Pick . Simply buy the products online and get them shipped directly to your farm. It’s just one of many ways we’re making farming better for farmers . Copyright © 2014 - 2023 Farmer's Business Network, Inc. All rights Reserved. The sprout logo, “FBN”, and “FBN Direct” are trademarks or registered trademarks of Farmer's Business Network, Inc.. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners. FBN Direct products and services and other products distributed by FBN Direct in the United States are offered by FBN Inputs, LLC and are available only in states where FBN Inputs, LLC is licensed and where those products are registered for sale or use, if applicable. ALWAYS READ AND FOLLOW LABEL DIRECTIONS. It is a violation of federal, state and provincial law to use any pesticide product other than in accordance with its label. The distribution, sale and use of an unregistered pesticide is a violation of federal, provincial and/or state law and is strictly prohibited. It is your responsibility to confirm prior to purchase and use that a product is labeled for your specific purposes, including, but not limited to, your target crop or pest and its compatibility with other products in a tank mix and that the usage of a product is otherwise consistent with federal, state, provincial, and local laws.  In all applicable jurisdictions, you must have a valid applicator license and/or be a certified farmer to use restricted use pesticides.   All product recommendations and other information provided is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for consulting the product label or for specific agronomic, business, or professional advice. Where specific advice is necessary or appropriate, consult with a qualified advisor.


Article Chemicals

How to Read a Chemical Label

Feb 27, 2023

by FBN Network

The cardinal rule of ag chemicals: Always read the label . Your best resource for learning how to use your product safely and effectively is the manufacturer. This helpful guide will ensure that everyone on your operation has a safe and successful application .   Active Ingredient Statement The Active Ingredient Statement provides the name and amount of each active ingredient and the total ratio of inert ingredients in the container. The important chemical(s) are individually listed on the label by the common and/or chemical name and the concentration (as a percentage) in the product. Liquid products generally show both the percentage of the active ingredient and the amount in the container. Since all liquid products don’t weigh the same, it is important to understand the pounds of active ingredient in each gallon. Dry products usually only list the percentage of the active in the package. If the label says a product has 50% of an active ingredient, then you can multiply the percentage by 16 oz. to figure out the amount of active in the package. Key Pests Controlled The list of pests controlled by a given product should be listed under the brand name. This is often not the complete list of labeled crops or pests, so make sure you review the entire label and verify that the crop you plan to spray is identified. Don’t rely on general terms of what the product will control. If you’re spraying for rootworm in corn, make sure the label specifically identifies the product’s use for Corn Rootworm . Or if you’re trying to control Palmer amaranth in corn, make sure the product is specifically labeled for Palmer Amaranth in a crop crop.  EPA Registration Number and Establishment Number The EPA Registration Number indicates the specific company who registered the chemical and verifies that it has been approved for sale. The EPA Establishment Number Identifies the approved EPA facility where the product was manufactured. How to Read a Chemical Label Click here to better understand how to read a chemical label. What’s in the Container? Commercial Name The brand name given by the manufacturing company, for example, Willowood Mesotrione 4SC. Common Name The name given by the EPA to a chemical for easier recognition. Callisto is the common name for Mesotrione. Chemical Name The technical name that identifies the chemical components and structure. For example, 2-[4-(methylsulfonyl)-2-nitrobenzoyl]-1,3-cyclohexanedione, or Mesotrione. Inert Ingredients These ingredients are not required to be individually listed, but the total inert concentration must be listed. Variations in inert ingredients can affect the performance of the active ingredient, so it’s important to talk with your local crop consultants, pest control advisors, and university extension agents to understand their effect on particular crops, soils, and pests. Signal Words Signal words indicate the relative acute toxicity of the product to humans and animals. If two products will control the same pest, signal words can help you choose the least toxic option. There are 4 types of signal words: DANGER ☠ POISON - Highly toxic by any route of entry into the body. DANGER - Can cause severe eye damage or skin irritation. WARNING - Moderately toxic either orally, dermally, or through inhalation; causes moderate eye or skin irritation. CAUTION - Slightly toxic either orally, dermally, or through inhalation; causes slight eye or skin irritation. Learn more about understanding signal words. Other Information on the Label Precautionary Statements Information about possible hazards. Additional information can be found in the Material Safety Data Sheet, (MSDS, which are currently being renamed simply Safety Data Sheets or SDS). Includes Hazards to Humans and Domestic Animals and Environmental, Physical and Chemical Hazards. First Aid or Statement of Practical Treatment Direction on what to do if someone accidentally comes in contact or is poisoned by a pesticide. ALWAYS call the National Poison Center Hotline ( 1-800-222-1222 ) for further medical instructions. Since the label has information the doctor will need, it is important to have the label available when calling the hotline or when taking someone to the doctor or hospital. Directions for Use “It is a violation of federal law to use any pesticide in a manner inconsistent with its labeling.” This section explains how to properly use the product to get the best results without harming yourself, others, or the environment. You can search for and read thousands of chemical labels here. The label’s directions for use will tell you: What pests this product is registered to control Where the product can and cannot be used (plants, animals, locations) How to apply (or not apply) the product How much product to use, often a range for soil type, organic matter, or plant size Timing of when the product should be applied, either time of year, or stage of the crop How many times you can apply the product How soon the crop can be harvested after application The Re-Entry Interval (REI), is the period of time after which it’s safe for people to return to a treated area after application Storage and Disposal This section explains how to store the product and what to do with the unused portion of the product and the empty container. Always keep products in original containers, out of the reach of children, and in a locked storage area. Be aware that temperature can affect product quality and environmental safety. Do not contaminate food or foodstuffs. For proper container disposal, always triple-rinse, puncture, and dispose of the container according to your local and state regulations.  Find links to state and national regulations here . Find the inputs you need using  FBN Direct® You can double down on savings and convenience when you shop for ag chemicals on  FBN Direct . FBN Direct  has the products you need to run your operation smoothly this season like  Willowood Glypho 6 ,  Willowood Clethodim 2EC  and  2,4-D LV6 Value Pick . Simply buy the products online and get them shipped directly to your farm. It’s just one of many ways we’re making farming better  for farmers . Copyright © 2014 - 2023 Farmer's Business Network, Inc. All rights Reserved. The sprout logo, “Farmers Business Network”, “FBN”, “FBN Direct” are trademarks, registered trademarks or service marks of Farmer's Business Network, Inc. FBN Direct products and services and other products distributed by FBN Direct are offered by FBN Inputs, LLC and are available only in states where FBN Inputs, LLC is licensed and where those products are registered for sale or use, if applicable. If applicable, please check with your local extension service to ensure registration status. Nothing contained on this page, including the prices listed should be construed as an offer for sale, or a sale of products. All products and prices are subject to change at any time and without notice. Terms and conditions apply. ALWAYS READ AND FOLLOW LABEL DIRECTIONS. It is a violation of federal and state law to use any pesticide product other than in accordance with its label. The distribution, sale and use of an unregistered pesticide is a violation of federal and/or state law and is strictly prohibited. We do not guarantee the accuracy of any information provided on this page or which is provided by us in any form. It is your responsibility to confirm prior to purchase and use that a product is labeled for your specific purposes, including, but not limited to, your target crop or pest and its compatibility with other products in a tank mix and that the usage of a product is otherwise consistent with federal, state and local laws. We reserve the right to restrict sales on a geographic basis in our sole discretion. You must have a valid applicator license to use restricted use pesticides. Please consult your state department of agriculture for complete rules and regulations on the use of restricted use pesticides, as some products require specific record-keeping requirements. All product recommendations and other information provided is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to be a substitute for consulting the product label or for specific agronomic, business, or professional advice. Where specific advice is necessary or appropriate, consult with a qualified advisor. Neither Farmer's Business Network Inc. nor any of its affiliates makes any representations or warranties, express or implied, as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in the material and any liability therefore is expressly disclaimed.


Feb 27, 2023

by FBN Network

Verifying the liabilities on your balance sheet is a crucial step in the loan application process. By presenting accurate and up-to-date information, you help to ensure a smooth and efficient Ag loan application process. As a farmer, you likely have many more important things on your mind than reviewing a financial statement. To streamline your balance sheet review process, here are a few steps to take as you get started. Confirm Verifications Against Your Balance Sheet  Your main priority should be ensuring that the verifications match your current balance sheet date. Only use current (or as recent as possible) information to give the lender you are working with an accurate picture of your financial situation. This enables them to provide you with the best solution available for your needs. Get an Official Statement from Your Lender To verify your liabilities, obtain a statement directly from your current lender. If you are unable to do so, you may be able to download a PDF statement or use screenshots from the lender’s online portal as an alternative way to provide the necessary information. It is important that the information contains your lender’s letterhead in order to validate the information provided. Provide All Required Information  For each of your liabilities, verifications need to include: Name Date Account number Current balance Interest rate Payment information  If you are missing some of the above information, it could make it difficult to complete the verification step and may delay your Ag loan application process.  [Interested in applying for an Ag land loan but not sure where to start? Click here to access our free guide, Ag Land Loans 101: Everything Farmers Need to Know About Securing Land Financing .] Loans from FBN® Finance Applying for a loan can sometimes feel like a daunting process, but the loan advisor team at FBN Finance is here to help. With an average of 15+ years each in Ag finance experience, FBN loan advisors are available to talk you through all facets of the real estate loan process, discuss any questions or concerns you may have and make sure you get the solution that best fits the unique needs of your Ag operation.  Click here , complete the brief form below, or call 866-619-3080 to get started. Copyright © 2014 - 2023 Farmer's Business Network, Inc. All rights Reserved. The sprout logo, and “FBN” are trademarks, registered trademarks or service marks of Farmer's Business Network, Inc.  Terms and conditions apply. Land financing offered by FBN Finance, LLC, provided in connection with Farmer Mac and our underwriting partners, and is available only where FBN Finance, LLC is licensed. To qualify, a borrower must be a member of Farmer’s Business Network, Inc., and meet the underwriting requirements of FBN Finance, LLC and its lending partners. All credit is subject to approval and underwriting. Interest rates and fees will vary depending on your individual situation. Not all applicants will qualify


Feb 16, 2023

by FBN Network

SAN CARLOS, Calif., February 16, 2023 -- Farmers Business Network (FBN®), the global AgTech platform and farmer-to-farmer network, today announced the appointment of John Vaske to the role of Chief Executive Officer.  FBN Co-Founder and current CEO Amol Deshpande will step down as CEO effective February 28 to pursue other interests. Vaske steps into the role having served on FBN ’s Board of Directors since 2017. Raised on a farm in Iowa, Vaske brings more than three decades of expertise in agriculture and technology, and most recently has served as the Head, Americas and Head, Agribusiness for Temasek (until 2021), one of the world’s most active global agri-food investors. In his new role with FBN , Vaske will lead the company’s next chapter with a focus on long-term, sustainable profitable growth by empowering family farms around the world.  “ FBN was founded with the mission to improve the profitability of family farms and assist the great small business entrepreneurs in rural America. While much has changed since founding, the mission has not. I am proud of what our team has accomplished and the impact we have had, building to a scale that hardly anyone expected when we started," said Amol Deshpande, Co-Founder and current CEO of FBN . “John has been on the board of FBN for five years and has a family farming background. This mission alignment makes me excited about his future as CEO of FBN and the prospects for our continued growth.”   “Having grown up on a farm in Iowa, I know firsthand the challenges of the work farmers do and recognize deeply the impact it has on the broader economy. Amol and the team founded FBN to empower farmers and enhance their livelihoods," said Vaske. “ FBN has grown from a digital analytics network to a full commercial platform, spanning over 55,000 farmer members, supporting farmers with nearly all aspects of their operations. Our growth has been remarkable so far, but FBN is just getting started serving farmers. I’m excited to partner with the team to scale a technology-powered, farmer-centric commercial system for agriculture.”  FBN Board Chair Kathleen Ligocki added: "Amol and the FBN team have done the unimaginable since founding FBN nine years ago. FBN has become a global platform disrupting one of the most complex, difficult and entrenched industries in the world, with one of the world’s most important customers, family farms. Humanity’s future literally depends on our farmers, and Amol and the team had the vision and tenacity to challenge the system to create a more financially and environmentally sustainable farm system. I believe that John, as a proven expert in agriculture and technology companies, is exactly the right person to lead the company, as it continues to transform the agricultural system in the coming years.” Today's announcement comes on the heels of several announcements: in recent months the company has released Bridge Loans for farmland and surpassed $1 billion  in producer financing, launched its livestock partnership with Boveta Nutrition™, its strategic collaboration with Greeneye Technology Precision Spraying System, and held its most successful Farmer2Farmer event ever in Omaha, Nebraska.  About FBN: Farmers Business Network® (FBN®) is an independent AgTech platform and farmer-to-farmer network with a mission to power the prosperity of family farmers around the world while working towards a sustainable future. Its Farmers First® promise has attracted over 55,000 members to the network with a common goal of helping farmers maximize their farm’s profit potential with data and technology enabled direct-to farmer commerce, community and sustainability offerings. FBN has set out to redefine value and convenience for farmers by helping reduce the cost of production and maximize the value of their crops. The FBN network has grown to cover more than 117 million acres of member farms in the US, Canada, and Australia. Blending the best of Midwestern agricultural roots and Silicon Valley technology, the company has principal offices in San Carlos, CA, Chicago, IL, Sioux Falls, SD, a Canadian Headquarters in High River, Alberta, and an Australian Headquarters in Perth with significant warehouse and logistics, remote and field employees across the US, Canada and Australia. To learn more, visit: www.fbn.com . Terms and conditions apply. Land financing offered by FBN Finance, LLC, provided in connection with Farmer Mac and our underwriting partners, and is available only where FBN Finance, LLC is licensed. To qualify, a borrower must be a member of Farmer’s Business Network, Inc., and meet the underwriting requirements of FBN Finance, LLC and its lending partners. All credit is subject to approval and underwriting. Interest rates and fees will vary depending on your individual situation. Not all applicants will qualify. Media Contact Keith Chapman media@farmersbusinessnetwork.com 


Feb 14, 2023

by FBN Network

FBN announced today that the company has now surpassed $1 billion in total capital financed to borrowers. This milestone illustrates how the growing number of members rely on FBN to gain faster, less expensive, and more reliable access to capital to run and grow their operations.  FBN Finance provides farmers with a new avenue for financing, empowering them to access a network of lending partners that provide low rates and fair terms. These finance offerings are designed based on farmer feedback and tailored to fit FBN members' specific needs – ranging from land financing , operating lines , equipment financing , input financing , and more. Because of FBN 's innovative data analysis, lending and underwriting decisions are optimized and expedited.  "We're always looking to provide our farmers with the most competitive options on the market, especially in this current climate of high interest rates and economic uncertainty," said Devin Lammers, President of FBN Financial.  Today's FBN Finance news comes on the heels of several announcements: in recent months the company has launched its livestock partnership with Boveta Nutrition™, its strategic collaboration with Greeneye Technology Precision Spraying System, and held its most successful Farmer2Farmer event ever in Omaha, Nebraska.  For more information on available financing solutions from FBN Finance, click here or complete the form below to connect directly with a member of our loan advisory team. Copyright © 2014 - 2023 Farmer's Business Network, Inc. All rights Reserved. The sprout logo, “Farmers Business Network”, “FBN”, "Farmers First", “FBN Direct” , "F2F", and "F2F Genetics Network" are trademarks, registered trademarks or service marks of Farmer's Business Network, Inc. Terms and conditions apply. Land financing offered by FBN Finance, LLC, provided in connection with Farmer Mac and our underwriting partners, and is available only where FBN Finance, LLC is licensed. To qualify, a borrower must be a member of Farmer’s Business Network, Inc., and meet the underwriting requirements of FBN Finance, LLC and its lending partners. All credit is subject to approval and underwriting. Interest rates and fees will vary depending on your individual situation. Not all applicants will qualify.