Author

Jeff Vanrobaeys

Jeff Vanrobaeys

Jeff Vanrobaeys CCA, 4R NMS

Jeff is the Canadian Senior Staff Agronomist at FBN and has worked in agriculture for over 30 years. He has worked in a number of different roles including research, agronomy,  territory management, and retail. Jeff is originally from Manitoba where his family continues to farm.


Jun 23, 2022

by Jeff Vanrobaeys

Many wheat growing geographies in Canada  have received substantial amounts of rain this spring, in addition to the challenges of preparing seed beds and planting, excessive rainfall can also fuel disease.  Given these conditions, and if they match in your area, this could be the right time to apply to wheat. (1) show that protecting the flag leaf of wheat, triticale, and oats from disease can assure 70 percent or higher of the crops yield potential. Plan to protect yields with a treatment when conditions align for the best chances to protect your crop from a likely pressure. In an anticipated high disease pressure year, consider applying a protective fungicide treatment to wheat. It is too late to make a preventative application, once disease pressure and damage is already visible within a field. Types of fungicide treatment A fungicide application  helps protect further damage to the plant and as a result can greatly impact yield. There are many types of wheat and small grain fungicides. Those fungicides that contain a strobilurin, such as azoxystrobin, (Group 11) or a triazole, such as triticonazole, (Group 3) are common choices for wheat growers. A combination of both Group 11 and Group 3 fungicides are commonly used as well. Products that contain  strobilurin should not be applied past anthesis as it can increase the DON level of grain.  is an excellent option to apply after flowering.  One of the major advantages of prothio - teb is the product is both a contact and systemic fungicide so as result the product has great curative and preventative properties. Always scout early for leaf diseases, FBN® has great fungicide options from flag leaf to flowering stage of development. Sources (1) University of Nebraska Crop Watch  https://cropwatch.unl.edu/2018/wheat-disease-update


Jun 14, 2022

by Jeff Vanrobaeys

Peas are a great nitrogen fixing crop option that can improve soil health. Growing peas allows a grower to introduce different herbicide groups into their herbicide rotation plan.  FBN® is well positioned to support your field pea crop in western Canada.  Let’s look at four ways to get to get the most out of your field pea crop this year: 1. Planting Rather than relying on using refined nitrogen in peas, inoculants are a great tool  to promote nodulation and as a result nitrogen fixation. Inoculants can be applied as a liquid or peat product directly on seed or alternatively granular inoculants can be applied in furrow during planting. offers several Liquid and Granular Inoculants to fit most needs, maximizing inoculation, and ensuring N fixation. Rolling peas after planting helps bury rocks and provides a uniform seedbed aiding with plant establishment and helps prepare the field for harvest. 2. Weed Control Season-long weed control in peas can be challenging, so using a residual product can help improve extend efficacy. combines two effective modes of action: Imazamox (group 2) and Bentazon (Group 6) and provides contact as well as residual control on many weeds in Field Peas. Benz offers  broadleaf and grass weed control in Field peas and has equivalent or higher efficiency comparable to other commercial products. Benz provides great control of Volunteer Canola (all types) and All (even herbicide resistant) Wild Mustard, as well as control of Cleavers and Kochia and suppression of Wild Buckwheat For best grassy weed control in peas, applying a tank mix of  with Benz is recommended.  Available in 2 x 8.1L Cases or 129.6 L Drums, and can be purchased with Pro Ag UAN 28-0-0 from to complete the package. 3. Micronutrient Support Augmenting fertility if required, and providing micronutrients that help support  plant health and  alleviate post herbicide application stress, helps plants quickly recover from herbicide application. B Sure is a proven biostimulant that helps the pea plant in abiotic conditions. From moisture stress to hail, frost or herbicide application, B Sure is a very effective product to support plant productivity. 4. Fungicide  There are multiple tools available to help manage and mitigate anticipated disease pressure in peas.  offers effective pulse fungicides that control the most damaging diseases in peas, while maximizing a growers ROI potential.  , , are key strobiluron’s to control key pulse diseases such as Aschocyta and Anthracnose.  Shop now Check out to learn more about our full range of crop protection products. 


May 24, 2022

by Jeff Vanrobaeys

Optimizing your chemistry program to help maximize yield potential is important and there are many ways growers can do so. Factoring in that canola seed is expensive, maximizing yield is always a high priority.  Here are 5 ways to get the most out of traited canola with non-selective herbicides: 1. Proper application timing and label rate Select the proper labeled rate for the weeds present and their staging. Spray early when weeds are still small enough for good control. Consider a second in crop application if weed pressure is still high after the first application, or a second flush of weeds occurs. 2. Use a surfactant Using a surfactant provides many values such as: Spraying efficacy Drift reduction Water conditioning Anti foaming FBN® has several Utility Modifiers in  our portfolio such as and ® that enhance the performance of  and Advantage  . 3. Importance of multiple modes of action and mixing order Utilizing multiple modes of action is a good stewardship practice to help delay the development of herbicide resistant weeds. offers Canola Acre packs containing a combination of glufosinate and , which takes the guesswork out of tank mixing two different products. You can also enhance weed control by tank mixing and applying multiple products from different herbicide groups. The sequence of tank mixing herbicides is another factor to consider when combining products. Tank mixing order can impact the product suspension and is often a factor that can impact clogging or plugging spray nozzles. Here are two examples of different mixing orders you could utilize: Mix a surfactant in , followed by and finally , Mix , surfactant, glufosinate ammonium, .  4. Insect control  High flea beetle pressure can have large impacts upon yield. When a seed treatment is not controlling 25% feeding damage, has two very effective options to control flea beetles: and 5. Chemistry rotation  Considering the annual chemistry rotation is another tool growers can use to improve weed control throughout the season.  Introducing a rotation of (group 9) with (group 10) and (group 2) along with   (group 1) and (group 4) helps diversify the herbicide groups used on farm.


May 10, 2022

by Jeff Vanrobaeys

Weeds are a threat to every farming operation and the number of herbicide-resistant weeds continues to grow every year. Creating a strategy to delay the development of resistant weeds is important and should be prioritized on every farm.  As of April 2022, the U.S. has 127 unique herbicide resistant weeds and Canada has 52.¹ There are a number of ways a grower can take a proactive approach to ensure a weed resistance management strategy is implemented on every acre. Let’s get into the weeds with the five ways to delay the development of herbicide resistant weeds: 1. Tank Mixing & Multiple Modes of Action Whenever possible, it’s important to prioritize tank mixing multiple herbicide groups to enhance weed control and mitigate the development of herbicide resistant weeds.  A pre-seed application is a great opportunity to include multiple modes of action from different herbicide groups that target the same weeds.² (group 14) and (group 6) are both excellent herbicide options that tank mix well with pre-seed for most crops. 2. Crop Rotation Diversifying your crop rotation will optimize fertility, and mitigate disease and pest infestation. As well, this will provide you with the opportunity to utilize different selective chemistries for your crops. Consider rotating crops with different seeding and harvest windows to target weeds at optimal points throughout the growing season. Implementing both a diverse crop and chemistry rotation helps to prevent weeds from maturing, setting seed, and becoming a challenge the following year. 3. Chemistry Rotation Throughout the Season It’s a good strategy to use different herbicide groups at different points in the season that target the same weed spectrum. As part of an integrated weed management program, tank mixing products from multiple herbicide groups with every application and focusing on diversifying the annual chemistry rotation is recommended. 4. Effective Herbicide Application Keeping clean fields year over year helps reduce the opportunity for herbicide resistant weeds to develop, set seed, and propagate. When using products, it’s recommended to always use the label rate and directions to help you best achieve clean fields and minimize weed growth. Utilizing best practices regarding boom height, water volume, wind speed, and sprayer speed increase your chances of eliminating herbicide resistant weeds. 5. Maintaining Clean Fields with Multiple Applications Throughout the Season Preemergence Early weed control is recommended as herbicides are typically most effective on small weeds.³ Most product labels do not target later stages of weed development and, as a result, weeds can mature, set seed, and become a challenge to control. (group 4) is an example of a preemergence product with residual control that can be applied prior to planting cereals that targets kochia (including group 2 resistant biotypes).   In Crop As a grower, you need to scout your fields to tailor your herbicide post emergence program to maximize and diversify weed control programs. Regional differences in weed pressures and crop mix potentially require more selective herbicide tank mix partners to control all types of weeds in the field.   There are multiple tank mix options that can be customized according to crop and target weed spectrum. For example, tank mixing Steel (group 2 and 4) and MCPA (group 4) are options for an in crop application in cereals. Another potential tank mix is (group 10) with (group 1) and (group 4) for an in crop application in glufosinate tolerant canola.  Post-Harvest Burndown Combining a non-selective herbicide and a selective herbicide in a post-harvest application can be a very effective way to incorporate different herbicide groups and modes of action.  Prioritizing weed control in the fall will help to minimize weed seed development and weed pressure the following year. Always add another effective mode of action like a group 2 or 4 when applying glyphosate.  For example, tank mixing (group 2), 2,4-D (group 4) or  (group 4) with (group 9) for a post-harvest application. Protecting the long-term sustainability of your operation starts with protecting your crops by implementing a robust weed management strategy that incorporates cropping and chemistry diversity.  Shop for Herbicides Through FBN Find the products you need at . With a diverse product portfolio, we provide the product options growers like you need to develop an integrated weed management strategy. You can also learn more about our available crop nutrition solutions, seed, animal health products, and more Sources: